Nikon D7100


    Photo Review 8.8
    User Rating: 0/10 (0 votes cast)

    Thank you for rating!

    You have already rated this item, you can only rate it once!

    Your rating has been changed, thanks for rating!

    Log in or create a user account to rate.

    Nikon D7100

      In summary

       Features-wise the D7100 has plenty to offer for photo enthusiasts and boasts impressive specifications for its price tag. The bright, full frame view viewfinder is a big plus here, as is the sharp data overlay that makes it easy to view shooting information as shots are composed.

      Landscape and architectural photographers will welcome the removal of the low-pass filter from the sensor as it will enable them to achieve very high resolution with capable lenses. Those who shoot in dim lighting will appreciate the camera's superior high-ISO performance and the capable noise-reduction processing.

      Professional photographers – in particular wedding and portrait shooters – could find the D7100 a useful second body, particularly if they want to reduce the weight they carry but still retain most aspects of professional performance and adjustability. Support for Nikon's Advanced Wireless lighting enables the built-in flash to be used in Commander mode for triggering up to three groups of external flash units.

      The camera's video capabilities provide plenty of HD recording settings (although none at standard definition) and users benefit from  full-time autofocus and manual control over exposure and recording levels plus the ability to connect an external microphone and headphone to the camera.

      Sports and wildlife photographers should find the 6 fps continuous shooting speed appealing, particularly when the camera is used in the 1.3x crop mode, where the AF sensor array covers most of the recording area.  However, for those who prefer recording raw files, the limited capacity of the buffer memory will be problematic. (High buffer capacities are only available with JPEG capture).

       

      Full review

      Announced in late February as an update to the popular D7000, Nikon's D7100 features the same 24-megapixel sensor as the D5200 and D3200 but without an optical low-pass filter in front of it. Theoretically, this should produce higher resolution, although you'll need top-quality lenses to realise it. The D7100's AF system has been improved substantially with additional sensor points and algorithms derived from the Nikon D4.
       

       Angled view of the Nikon D7100  with the 18-105mm lens that will be offered as one of the kit options. (Source: Nikon.)

      Who's it For?
       Features-wise the D7100 has plenty to offer for photo enthusiasts and boasts impressive specifications for its price tag. The bright, full frame view viewfinder is a big plus here, as is the sharp data overlay that makes it easy to view shooting information as shots are composed.

      Landscape and architectural photographers will welcome the removal of the low-pass filter from the sensor as it will enable them to achieve very high resolution with capable lenses. Those who shoot in dim lighting will appreciate the camera's superior high-ISO performance and the capable noise-reduction processing.

      Professional photographers – in particular wedding and portrait shooters – could find the D7100 a useful second body, particularly if they want to reduce the weight they carry but still retain most aspects of professional performance and adjustability. Support for Nikon's Advanced Wireless lighting enables the built-in flash to be used in Commander mode for triggering up to three groups of external flash units.

      The camera's video capabilities provide plenty of HD recording settings (although none at standard definition) and users benefit from full-time autofocus and manual control over exposure and recording levels plus the ability to connect an external microphone and headphone to the camera.

      Sports and wildlife photographers should find the 6 fps continuous shooting speed appealing, particularly when the camera is used in the 1.3x crop mode, where the AF sensor array covers most of the recording area.  However, for those who prefer recording raw files, the limited capacity of the buffer memory will be problematic. (High buffer capacities are only available with JPEG capture).
       
      What's New?
       Physically, the D7100 bears a close resemblance to the D7000. Its control layout is also similar, as illustrated in the comparison photographs of the below.
       

       Back views of the Nikon D7100 (top) and D7000 (below). (Source: Nikon.)
       

       Top views of the Nikon D7100 (top) and D7000 (below). (Source: Nikon.)

       Like its predecessor, the D7100 is solidly constructed with a magnesium alloy chassis and weatherproof sealing to prevent dust and moisture from entering. The new camera's body is marginally larger than the body of the D7000 which we reviewed in January 2011, although it's also a little lighter.

      The illustrations above show the positions of the weatherproof seals in the D7100 body. (Source: Nikon.)

      The main differences between the control layouts in the two cameras are as follows:
       - A new Effects setting has been added to the mode dial, providing users with a similar palette of in-camera adjustments to the effects settings in the D5200. This mode accesses seven settings that apply the following effects: Night Vision, Colour Sketch, Miniature, Selective Colour, High Key or Low Key. This array is similar to the effects settings provided in the D5200 and, as in that camera, only JPEG images are processed; if the camera is set to record NEF.RAW files, fine-quality JPEGs will be recorded instead.
       - The metering mode button has been moved back to provide space for a new Movie recording button, which is in the same place as on the D600  and D800. (This button is only active when the camera is in live view movie mode.)
      - The switch for toggling between auto and manual focus is a button on the top of the Auto/Manual focus lever. (It's not an ideal position.)
      - A pair of stereo microphone grilles is located just in front of the hot-shoe.
      - The positions of the ISO/reduce and Quality/magnify buttons have been reversed.
      - The Live View selector has been moved below the arrow pad and now consists of a button surrounded by a lever that toggles between still and movie recording.
      - The monitor screen is larger, with a 3.2-inch diagonal and its resolution has increased to 1,228,800 dots. It uses a new RGBW alignment for increased brightness with an integrated glass-and-panel structure for a clearer display that matches the monitors on theD4, D800 series and D600 cameras.
      - Up to 38x magnification is available for image playback in DX (24 x 16) format.
      - The Scene Recognition System takes data from a 2016-pixel RGB sensor and the camera's image sensor and uses brightness and colour information to adjust autofocusing and exposure and, if required, set the i-TTL flash and auto white balance controls.

      The dual card slots take two SD cards and the camera can be configured to send data to either or both cards. (Source: Nikon.)

      Aside from the above, the D7100 carries over its predecessor's dual SD card slots, which are compatible with the latest memory cards. When two cards are loaded, users can set the second card to the Overflow or Backup function or record NEF.RAW files and JPEG files to separate cards. The Movie-settings > Destination option in the shooting menu lets the camera be set to record movie clips and still images separately.

      The table below outlines the main similarities and differences between the D7100 and the D7000.

       

      D7100

      D7000

      Body dimensions

      135.5 x 106.5 x 76 mm

      132 x 105 x 77 mm

      Body weight

      675 grams

      690 grams

      Effective resolution

      24.1 megapixels

      16.2 megapixels

      Optical low-pass filter

      No

      Yes

      Image processor

      EXPEED 3

      EXPEED 2

      Monitor size

      3.2-inch

      3-inch

      Screen resolution

      1,228,800 dots

      920,000 dots

      Viewfinder

      Pentaprism with 100% coverage and 0.94x magnification; non-interchangeable focusing screens

      AF system

      51 points with 15 cross-type sensors

      39 points with 9 cross-type sensors

      Battery/CIPA rating

      EN-EL15 / 920 shots

      EN-EL15 / 1050 shots

      1.3x crop mode

      Yes

      No

      ISO range

      ISO 100 - 6400, expandable to ISO 25600

      Metering sensor

      2016-pixel RGB

      Scene pre-sets

      Portrait, Landscape, Child, Sports, Close-up, Night portrait, Night Landscape, Party/Indoor,  Beach/Snow, Sunset, Dusk/Dawn, Pet Portrait, Candlelight, Blossom, Autumn Colours, Food

      Portrait, Landscape, Child, Sports, Close-up, Night portrait, Night Landscape, Beach/Snow, Sunset, Dusk/dawn, Pet Portrait, Candlelight, Blossom, Autumn Colours, Food, Silhouette, High Key, Low Key

      In-camera effects

      Night Vision, Colour Sketch, Miniature Effect, Selective Colour, High Key, Low Key, Silhouette

      No

      Movie settings (PAL)

      1920 x 1080 at 50i (50 fields/s)  1920 x 1080; 30 p (progressive), 25p, 24p 1280 x 720; 50p

      1920 x 1080 at 24p/24 fps, 1280 x 720 at 24, 25 or 30 fps, 640 x 424 at 24 fps

      Microphone jack

      Yes

      Headphone jack

      Yes

      No

       

       

       

       

      Functionality Improvements
       Under the hood the changes have been more substantial, starting with the autofocusing system. The new Advanced Multi-CAM 3500DX autofocus sensor module has 51 focus points with 15 cross-type sensors covering the central area.

      The central point performs as a cross-type sensor down to f/8, enabling precise autofocusing at apertures slower than f/5.6 and enabling a 2x teleconverter to be used with telephoto lenses that have maximum apertures of f/4. New AF algorithms, equivalent to those used in the Nikon D4, support AF detection to -2 EV (ISO 100, 20°C), which is the equivalent of a scene illuminated by moonlight.

      A new 1.3x crop mode delivers an image size of 18.8 x 12.5 mm with a changed angle of view that becomes equivalent to roughly double the lens focal length, as specified for 35mm format. The resulting image size is approximately 15.4 megapixels.

      The diagrams above compare the area in the frame covered by the AF point array in the normal DX mode (top) and the 1.3x crop mode (below). Source: Nikon.

      In the 1.3x crop mode, the 51 focus points cover almost all of the image frame, improving focusing accuracy for shooting moving subjects. The top continuous shooting speed increases to seven frames/second with this setting and the buffer memory can hold more of the smaller files (see below).

      The D7100 inherits the Auto ISO program introduced in the D800, which allows the minimum shutter speed to be adjusted automatically, depending on the focal length of the lens fitted.  Users can set the maximum sensitivity and minimum shutter speed, although  both can be over-ridden, if required.
       Nikon's WU-1a Wi-Fi unit can also be plugged into the D7100's accessory port, enabling images to be sent wirelessly to a smart-phone or tablet and providing remote control of various camera functions in Live View mode.  

      Sensor and Image Processing
       Although the D7100's sensor is essentially the same as the Toshiba chip in the D5200 which we reviewed in March, the removal of the optical low-pass filter should, in theory, enable it to produce images with slightly higher resolution. As in the D5200, the sensor is paired with the same EXPEED 3 processor.

      This means the D7100 can support a native ISO range from 100 to 6400 in steps of 1/3 EV as well as expansion to ISO 25600 (equivalent) in 1/3 EV steps. It also claims a maximum continuous shooting speed of six frames/second for up to 33 full-resolution JPEGs or 7 lossless-compressed NEF.RAW files at DX resolution or seven frames/second with the 1.3x crop.

      Otherwise the D7100 resembles the D5200. Raw files continue to be recorded in 14-bit compressed form and three image size settings are available for JPEGs. In DX format the Large files are recorded at 6000 x 4000 pixels, Medium at 4496 x 3000 pixels and Small at 2992 x 2000 pixels. 
       The table below shows typical image sizes, compression ratios and buffer capacities for images recorded in DX (24 x 16 mm) format.

      Image quality

      Image size

      File size

      Buffer capacity

      NEF.RAW Lossless compressed 14-bit

      6000 x 4000 pixels
       (L)

      28.5MB

      6

      NEF.RAW Lossless compressed 12-bit

      22.7MB

      7

      NEF.RAW compressed 14-bit

      24.9MB

      8

      NEF.RAW compressed 12-bit

      20.2MB

      9

      JPEG Fine

      L

      12.0MB

      33

      M

      7.4MB

      100

      S

      3.8MB

      JPEG Normal

      L

      6.2MB

      M

      3.7MB

      S

      1.9MB

      JPEG Basic

      L

      2.9MB

      M

      1.9MB

      S

      1.0MB

      The D7100 also offers a 1.3x crop mode that records images at 18 x 12 mm. With this crop, the Large files are recorded at 4800 x 3200 pixels, Medium at 3600 x 2400 pixels and Small at 2400 x 1600 pixels. The table below shows typical image sizes, compression ratios and buffer capacities for this setting.

      Image quality

      Image size

      File size

      Buffer capacity

      NEF.RAW Lossless compressed 14-bit

      4800 x 3200 pixels
       (L)

      18.8MB

      8

      NEF.RAW Lossless compressed 12-bit

      15.1MB

      12

      NEF.RAW compressed 14-bit

      16.3MB

      11

      NEF.RAW compressed 12-bit

      13.4MB

      14

      JPEG Fine

      L

      8.2MB

      73

      M

      5.0MB

      100

      S

      2.7MB

      JPEG Normal

      L

      4.1MB

      M

      2.5MB

      S

      1.4MB

      JPEG Basic

      L

      2.0MB

      M

      1.3MB

      S

      0.7MB

      Video
       Movie recording capabilities have been upgraded to match those of Nikon's more 'professional' DSLRs. Like the D5200, the D7100 can record in both interlaced (i) and progressive (p) formats.

      For Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) users have a choice of 30, 25 and 24 frames/second (fps) using progressive scanning, along with interlaced frame rates of 50 and 60 fps in both the 1.3x crop mode and at HD resolution (1280 x 720 pixels). Unlike the D5200, there is no option to record VGA clips for standard definition displays.

      The built-in microphone is stereo-capable and there's a new headphone out jack to allow monitoring of soundtracks during recording. The table below shows bit rates and maximum recording capacities.

      Frame size (pixels)

      Frame rate PAL

      Frame rate NTSC

      Max. bit rate
        (High/Normal)

      Max. clip length (High/Normal)

      1920 x 1080

      50i

      60i

      24/12

      20 min./29 min. 59 s

      25p

      30p

      24p

      1280 x 720

      50p

      60p

       The aperture- and shutter-priority shooting modes can't be used for recording videos, although you can set the shutter speed and ISO sensitivity in the M mode, provided it's done before recording begins. You can record a still frame while shooting a movie, but only with a 16:9 aspect ratio. Available image sizes are shown in the table below.

      Image area

      Size/quality setting

      Pixels

      DX (24 x 16)

      Large

      6000 x 3368

      Medium

      4496 x 2528

      Small

      2992 x 1680

      1.3x (18 x 12)

      Large

      4800 x 2696

      Medium

      3600 x 2024

      Small

      2400 x 1344

      The camera is able to deliver uncompressed video via its HDMI out port. But we weren't able to test this feature through lack of a suitable recording device.

      Playback and Software
        Both are virtually identical to those provided for the D5100

      Performance
      Nikon Australia provided us with two lenses to use with the D7100 body: the AF-S DX Micro Nikkor 40mm f/2.8G and the AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5G ED. Both lenses are reviewed separately. We've based our Imatest tests on shots taken with the Micro Nikkor 40mm f/2.8G lens but some sample images included in this review have been taken with the wide-zoom lens.

      Like the D7000, the D7100 produced clean JPEG files with plenty of detail and a wider than average dynamic range. The default colour saturation for JPEG files in the review camera was higher than we usually find in enthusiast DSLRs, a fact that was confirmed by our Imatest tests. Interestingly, NEF.RAW files converted into TIFF format with Adobe Camera Raw showed the camera capable of restrained saturation and excellent colour accuracy.

      The default exposure setting tended to produce slightly over-exposed results, regardless of the metering pattern used, particularly in bright sunlight. This issue was also found with the D7000 and, as with the D7000, exposures can be brought back into line by shooting in raw mode.

      Subjectively, we feel the new AF is both faster and more precise than the system in the D5200 when the viewfinder was used, although it remained noticeably slower in the Live View mode. Our timing tests showed this to be the case with both lenses.

      Imatest showed resolution to be higher than we found with the D5200 and up to expectations for a 24-megapixel camera for JPEG images. NEF.RAW files recorded resolution levels slightly above expectations in our Imatest tests. This is no mean feat for a camera of such high resolution.

      Resolution remained high through most of the camera's sensitivity range with both file types and, in both cases, it was significantly higher than the results we obtained from the D5200 we reviewed. A gradual decline in resolution was recorded as sensitivity was increased, as shown in the graph of our Imatest results below.

       

      The review camera exhibited outstanding performance at high sensitivity settings. Long exposures at night showed little noise right up to ISO 6400.  The Hi 1 and Hi 2 settings were slightly noise-affected with exposures of a second or two. Interestingly the review camera produced flash shots with almost no discernible noise at both of these settings and noise was undetectable in flash shots right up to ISO 6400.

      The built-in flash was able to record evenly balanced exposures across most of the camera's sensitivity range with the 40mm lens. Very slight under-exposure occurred at ISO 100 and by the Hi2 setting (equivalent to ISO 25600) flash shots were about a stop over-exposed. But for the remaining ISO settings exposures were evenly balanced and nicely positioned.
       We set the review camera some serious challenges in our tests of its movie-recording capability, including shooting in situations with a very wide brightness range and recording in dim artificial lighting. Video quality was generally good in the Full HD modes but the AF-F (video autofocusing) setting was relatively slow and tended to hunt, introducing obvious intervals in which the camera struggled to re-focus as the distance of subjects from the camera changed.

      We found no significant artefacts in clips at the higher resolutions. The 1.3x crop setting provided a default zooming effect, which was interesting but slightly reduced resolution in the HD shooting mode.

      The dynamic range in video mode was similar to the stills mode, which meant shadows contained a fair amount of detail while highlights could be slightly clipped in contrasty conditions. Soundtracks recorded by the built-in microphones were relatively clear with more stereo 'presence' than we expected – and audio levels can be adjusted before recordings commence. Interestingly, no wind-reduction filter is provided.

      We carried out our timing tests with the same 32GB SanDisk Extreme Pro SDHC UHS-1 card as we used for testing the D5200.  Faster than its predecessor, the review camera powered-up and shut down almost instantly. 

      When the viewfinder was used for shot composition, we measured an average capture lag of 0.3 seconds, which was eliminated with pre-focusing. In Live View mode, capture lag was extended to 1.4 seconds, reducing to 0.3 seconds with pre-focusing. Shot-to-shot times averaged 0.5 seconds when the viewfinder was used 2.5 seconds with Live View.  Shot-to-shot times with flash averaged 4.2 seconds. It took 0.5 seconds on average to process each JPEG file, 0.7 seconds for each NEF.RAW file and 0.8 seconds for each RAW+JPEG pair.

      In the continuous high-speed shooting mode, the review camera recorded 10 high-resolution JPEGs  in 1.7 seconds. It took six seconds to process this burst. The capture speed slowed after five NEF.RAW files, which were recorded in 0.9 seconds in the continuous high mode. Processing time for this burst was 8.8 seconds. For RAW+JPEG pairs, the buffer limit was five frames, which were captured on 0.7 second. It took 9.3 seconds to process this burst.

      With the 1.3x crop mode, the review camera recorded 10 high-resolution JPEGs  in 1.45 seconds, which equates to approximately seven frames/second. It took 5.1 seconds to process this burst. Changing to NEF.RAW files, we recorded eight frames in 2.6 seconds. It took just over eight seconds to process this burst.

       

      SPECS

       

       Image sensor: 23.5 x 15.6 mm CMOS sensor with 24.69 million photosites (24.1 megapixels effective)
       Image processor: EXPEED 3
       A/D processing: 12 or 14 bit
       Lens mount: Nikon F mount (with AF coupling and AF contacts)
       Focal length crop factor: 1.5x
       Image formats: Stills – NEF-RAW, JPEG (Exif 2.3), RAW+JPEG; Movies – MOV (H.264/MPEG-4 Advanced Video Coding with Linear PCM stereo audio
       Image Sizes: Stills – DX (24 x 16) image area: 6000 x 4000 (L), 4496 x 3000 (M), 2992 x 2000 (S); 1.3x (18 x 12) image area: 4800 x 3200 (L), 3600 x 2400 (M), 2400 x 1600 (S); Photographs with image area of DX (24 x 16) taken in movie live view 6000 x 3368 (L), 4494 x 2528 (M), 2992 x 1860 (S): Photographs with image area of 1.3x (18 x 12) taken in movie live view 4800 x 2696 (L), 3600 x 2024 (M), 2400 x 1344 (S); Movies: 1920 x 1080; 60i (59.94 fields/s)/ 50i (50 fields/s) * 1920 x 1080; 30 p (progressive), 25p, 24p 1280 x 720; 60p, 50p Actual frame rates for 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, and 24p are 59.94, 50, 29.97, 25, and 23.976 fps respectively; options support both high and normal image quality *Available only when 1.3x (18 x 12) is selected for Image area. Sensor output is about 60 or 50 fps.
       Image Stabilisation: Lens based
       Dust removal: Image sensor cleaning (vibration), Image Dust Off reference data (optional Capture NX 2 software required)
       Shutter speed range: 1/8000 to 30 seconds plus bulb, X-sync at 1/250 sec.
       Exposure Compensation: +/- 5 EV in increments of 1/3- or 1/2 EV in P, S, A, and M modes
       Exposure bracketing: 2 - 5 frames in steps of 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 1, 2, or 3 EV
       Other bracketing options: Flash bracketing, White balance bracketing, ADL bracketing
       Self-timer:  2 s, 5 s, 10 s, 20 s; 1 - 9 exposures at intervals of 0.5, 1, 2, or 3 s
       Focus system: Nikon Advanced Multi-CAM 3500DX autofocus sensor module with TTL phase detection, fine-tuning, 51 focus points (including 15 cross-type sensors; the centre 1 focus point is available at apertures slower than f/5.6 and faster than f/8 or at f/8), and AF-assist illuminator (range approx. 0.5 - 3m/1 ft 8 in. - 9 ft 10 in.)
       Focus modes: Autofocus (AF): Single-servo AF (AF-S); continuous-servo AF (AF-C); auto AF-S/AF-C selection (AF-A); predictive focus tracking activated automatically according to subject status Manual focus (M): Electronic rangefinder can be used
       Exposure metering: TTL exposure metering using 2016-pixel RGB sensor
       Metering modes: Matrix: 3D colour matrix metering II (type G and D lenses); colour matrix metering II (other CPU lenses); colour matrix metering available with non-CPU lenses if user provides lens data Centre-weighted: Weight of 75% given to 8 mm circle in centre of frame. Diameter of circle can be changed to 6, 10, or 13 mm, or weighting can be based on average of entire frame (non-CPU lenses use 8-mm circle) Spot: Meters 3.5 mm circle (about 2.5% of frame) centred on selected focus point (on centre focus point when non-CPU lens is used)
       Shooting modes: Auto modes (auto; auto (flash off)); programmed auto with flexible program (P); shutter-priority auto (S); aperture-priority auto (A); manual (M); scene modes (portrait; landscape; child; sports; close up; night portrait; night landscape; party/indoor; beach/snow; sunset; dusk/dawn; pet portrait; candlelight; blossom; autumn colours; food); special effects modes (night vision; colour sketch; miniature effect; selective colour; silhouette; high key; low key); U1 (user settings 1); U2 (user settings 2)
       Picture Style/Control settings: Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, Portrait, Landscape; selected Picture Control can be modified; storage for custom Picture Controls
       Colour space options: sRGB, Adobe RGB
       Custom functions: 8 categories with a total of 50 settings
       ISO range: ISO 100 - 6400 in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV. Can also be set to approx. 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1, or 2 EV (ISO 25600 equivalent) above ISO 6400; auto ISO sensitivity control available
       White balance: Auto (2 types), incandescent, fluorescent (7 types), direct sunlight, flash, cloudy, shade, preset manual (up to 6 values can be stored, spot white balance measurement available during live view), choose colour temperature (2500 K - 10000 K), all with fine-tuning
       Flash: Built-in; GN approx. 12/39, 12/39 with manual flash (m/ft, ISO 100, 20 °C/68 °F); supports Nikon Creative Lighting System (CLS)
       Flash modes: Auto, auto with red-eye reduction, auto slow sync, auto slow sync with red-eye reduction, fill-flash, red-eye reduction, slow sync, slow sync with red-eye reduction, rear-curtain with slow sync, rear-curtain sync, off; Auto FP High-Speed Sync supported
       Flash exposure adjustment: -3 to +1 EV in 1/3- or 1/2-EV increments
       Sequence shooting: Max. approx. 6 shots/sec. for up to 33 full-resolution JPEGs or 7 lossless-compressed NEF.RAW files with a UHS-I certified SDHC or SDXC card (7 fps possible with 1.3x crop mode)
       Storage Media: Dual slot for SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards; UHS-1 compatible
       Viewfinder: Eye-level glass pentaprism with 100% FOV coverage; 0.94x magnification (50 mm f/1.4 lens at infinity); Type B BriteView Clear Matte Mark II screen with AF area brackets (framing grid can be displayed) and organic EL display;19.5 mm eyepoint; -2 to +1 dpt adjustment
       LCD monitor: 3.2-inch TFT colour LCD with approx.1,228,800 dots; approx. 170 degree viewing angle; approx. 100% frame coverage; brightness adjustment
       Live View shooting: Live view photography (still images), movie live view (movies); Contrast-detect AF anywhere in frame (camera selects focus point automatically when face-priority AF or subject-tracking AF is selected)
       Playback functions: Full-frame and thumbnail (4, 9, or 72 images or calendar) playback with playback zoom, movie playback, photo and/or movie slide shows, histogram display, highlights, photo information, GPS data display, and auto image rotation
       Interface terminals: Hi-Speed USB 2.0, HDMI (Type C Mini), external microphone IN (3.5 mm stereo jack), Wireless remote controller: WR-1 and WR-R10); Remote cord: MC-DC2; GPS unit: GP-1; UT-1 Communication Unit; MB-D15 Multi-Power Battery Pack (accessories available separately)
       Power supply: EN-EL15 rechargeable lithium-ion battery; CIPA rated for approx. 920 shots/charge;  Optional MB-D15 multi-power battery pack with one rechargeable Nikon EN-EL15 Li-ion battery or six AA alkaline, Ni-MH, or lithium batteries
       Dimensions (wxhxd): Approx. 135.5 x 106.5 x 76 mm (body only)
       Weight: Approx. 675 grams (body only)

       

      TESTS

       Based on JPEG images.

       

       Based on NEF.RAW files converted into 16-bit TIFF format with Adobe Camera Raw.

       

      SAMPLES

       

       

      Auto white balance with incandescent lighting.

       Auto white balance with fluorescent lighting.
       

      30-second exposure at ISO 100; 40mm focal length, f/5.
       

      15-second exposure at ISO 800; 40mm focal length, f/8.
       

      6-second exposure at ISO 3200; 40mm focal length, f/11.
       

      6-second exposure at ISO 6400; 40mm focal length, f/16.
       

      3-second exposure at ISO Hi1 (12800 equivalent); 40mm focal length, f/16.
       
       

      2-second exposure at ISO Hi2 (25600 equivalent); 40mm focal length, f/22.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 100;1/60 second at f/5, 40mm focal length.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 800; 1/60 second at f/5, 40mm focal length.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 3200; 1/160 second at f/5, 40mm focal length.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 6400; 1/250 second at f/5, 40mm focal length.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO Hi1 (12800); 1/250 second at f/5, 40mm focal length.
       

      Flash exposure at ISO Hi2 (25600); 1/250 second at f/5, 40mm focal length.
       

      ISO 100, 24mm focal length, 1/80 second at f/11.
       
       

      ISO 100, 10mm focal length, 1/200 second at f/7.1.
       
       

      ISO 1000, 17mm focal length, 1/1000 second at f/16.
       
       

      Wide brightness range subject; ISO 180, 24mm focal length, 1/10 second at f/8.
       
       

      ISO 6400, 10mm focal length, 1/80 second at f/16.
       
       

      ISO 2000, 20mm focal length, 1/3 second at f/16.
       
       

      ISO Hi1, 10mm focal length, 1/20 second at f/16.
       
       

      ISO 2500, 10mm focal length, 1/15 second at f/3.5.
       

      Still frames from video clips taken with Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) 50i resolution.
       
       

      Still frames from video clips taken with Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) 25p resolution.
       
       

      Still frames from video clips taken with Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) 24p resolution.

       

      Still frames from video clips taken with HD (1280 x 720 pixels) 50p resolution.

      Still frame from Full HD movie taken with the 1.3x crop setting.

      Additional image samples can be found with our reviews of the AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5G ED and AF-S DX Micro Nikkor 40mm f/2.8G lenses.

       

      Rating

      RRP: n/a.  ASP: AU$1350; US$1200 (body only)

      • Build: 8.8
      • Ease of use: 8.8
      • Autofocusing: 8.8
      • Still image quality JPEG: 8.8
      • Still image quality RAW: 9.0
      • Video quality: 9.0

       

       

      BUY

        No