Olympus PEN Lite E-PL5


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    Olympus PEN Lite E-PL5

      In summary

      The E-PL5 is a nice little camera and would be an excellent choice for photographers who want a small and light interchangeable-lens camera with superior overall performance. Olympus has a wide choice of excellent lenses to match it and, if you can't find precisely the lens you want, there's a good chance it will be available from Panasonic or one of the increasing number of third-party manufacturers that have begun to develop lenses for the system.

      Sigma was one of the first with 19mm and 30mm  primes, both with f/2.8 maximum apertures. Tokina and Tamron indicated they would be designing lenses for the Micro 4/3 system at the beginning of this year.

      Buy this camera if:
       - You want a smart-looking mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses, raw file capture plus in-camera image stabilisation and effective dust reduction technology.
       - You'd like Full HD video recording with stereophonic sound.
       - You'd appreciate relatively fast autofocusing.

      Don't buy this camera if:
       - You require a built-in viewfinder and/or flash.
       - You have large hands and/or limited dexterity.

      Full review

      Olympus's PEN Lite E-PL5 is the fourth generation product in its line and the best PEN camera to date in our opinion. While it could be seen as an incremental update rather than a major re-build, it has the same 16.1-megapixel LiveMOS sensor and TruePic VI image processor as the renowned OM-D E-M5. Together, they promise significant performance enhancements and a welcome step up from the aged 12.3-megapixel sensor in the  E-PL3 and, although the new camera retains the styling of the E-PL3, it's a sleeker looking beast. 

       

      Angled front view of the PEN Lite E-PL5 in black with the 14-42mm kit lens. (Source: Olympus.)

      Scheduled for release from early November, the E-PL5 will be offered  black, silver and white in a single-lens kit at an RRP of AU$799 (US$800) or as a twin-lens kit for AU$999 (twin-lens kits weren't listed on the US website). The camera is bundled with the FL-LM1 clip-on flash (GN10 at ISO 200). Its AP-2 accessory port can accept the following optional VF-2 and VF-3 digital viewfinders, SEMA-1 external stereo microphone set and the PP-1 Bluetooth data transfer module.

      Build and Ergonomics
      Like the E-PL3, the new camera boasts an all-metal body. It's marginally larger than the E-PL3's but also 44 grams lighter. You would need a large pocket to accommodate the camera with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm f3.5-5.6 II R kit lens supplied the camera for our review.

      Front view of the PEN E-PL5 in white with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm f3.5-5.6 II R kit lens and monitor set for self-portraiture. (Source: Olympus.)

      The control layout in the new camera has barely changed since the E-PL3. The lens mount covers  roughly one third of the front panel, while an AF-Assist lamp/self-timer indicator sits in the top corner above the lens release button.

      The small size of the camera and its closely-spaced control buttons can cause you to press some buttons inadvertently. We often found we pressed the Menu button while tilting the monitor up or down. Fortunately, the Movie button is slightly further to the right than on the E-P3, which largely avoids similar problems.

      On the top panel is the mode dial with settings for iAuto, P, A, S, M, ART, SCN and Movie modes. The accessory port cover slides into rails on the top panel. Stereo microphones sit each side of the hot shoe, while a microphone grille is inset just behind the name plate.
       

      Top view of the PEN E-PL5 in silver with no lens fitted. (Source: Olympus.)

      While the button controls haven't changed since the E-PL3, the new camera's 3-inch wide monitor provides a wider,  more versatile range of adjustments. It can be turned up through 180 degrees to face forwards for self-portraiture or pulled out and angled horizontally for low-level shots. Adjustments to brightness and colour are supported across a range of +/- seven levels.
       

      Rear view of the PEN E-PL5's touch screen monitor, with the icon for engaging the touch shutter function circled in red. Face detection AF

      The monitor also introduces touch-screen controls, including a 'Touch Shutter' capability that focuses and triggers the shutter when you touch any part of the screen. Its resolution of 460,000 dots is the same as the E-P3's and significantly lower than the monitors of rival cameras.

      A new gapless design places the touch-sensitive layer between the liquid crystal layer and covering glass, eliminating the air gap between them. This should result in reduced back-reflections, less glare and improved contrast, although we found the monitor just as difficult to use in bright outdoor lighting as the monitors of previous models. (An optional EVF can be fitted to overcome this problem.)

      The monitor screen has an anti-smudge coating on the cover glass to reduce the effects of fingermarks and make the screen easier to keep clean. Users can choose between  Vivid and Natural display modes.

      The screen has an aspect ratio of 16:9, which is fine when shooting movies but crops the image at the camera's normal 4:3 aspect ratio. Cropping off the screen area in this way further reduces the quality of the on-screen image and appears to affect colour reproduction.

      The capacitive touch-screen  supports the following touch controls: shutter release, enlargement, Live Guide, AF area selection, AF area enlargement, frame forward/back, enlargement playback, Super Control Panel adjustments and Art Filter selection. LiveGuide is a new mode designed to help novice users make adjustments to key camera settings via touch-sensitive slider controls and see the results live on the monitor. This function is only available in the iAuto mode.

      For more experienced users, the new Super-Control Panel is also touch sensitive, allowing touch-based adjustments to be made to navigational settings and camera controls in shooting and playback modes. You can also activate a touch shutter function that will focus on the touched spot and fire the shutter simultaneously.

      The E-PL5 accepts  the two interchangeable grips introduced with the PEN E-P3.  It's supplied with the MCG-4 grip, which is attached to the body via a large, inset screw that can be tightened or released with a small coin.

      Olympus has introduced a new 'Dress Up' accessory grip (MCG-3PR), which is available in three patterns, Dot, Hounds tooth Check, and Stripe, along with a  matching lens cap (LC-37PR) in the same three patterns. (The Olympus UK website lists an additional six  'Dress Up' grips and caps.) These accessories can be difficult to find on online re-sellers' sites.
       
       

      Front views of the PEN E-PL5 in silver with and without the interchangeable MCG-4 grip. (Source: Olympus.)
       
       

      The new MCG-3PR grips and matching LC-37PR lens caps. (Source: Olympus.)

      The rechargeable battery and memory card share a compartment in the base of the camera, next to the metal-lined tripod socket. It's slightly off the optical axis of the lens and so close to the battery/card compartment as to prevent cards being changed when the camera is tripod mounted.

      A single interface port is located below the strap eyelet on the right hand side of the camera. It has a flip-up plastic cover attached with a flexible tag and contains sockets for HDMI and USB/AV-out connections. The strap eyelets are large and rattle a bit when the camera is carried hanging from your neck.

      The E-PL5 comes with the same FL-LM1 clip-on flash as the PL3. It has a GN of 10 metres at  ISO 200 and covers angles of view as wide as the 14mm lens. Flash synch is at up to 1/250 second with this flash or 1/200 second with other external flash units.

      Sensor and Image Processing
       Since our review of the OM-D E-M5, it's been revealed that the16.1-megapixel Live MOS imager used in the latest Olympus cameras has been made by Sony. Interestingly, last month Sony agreed to pay US$643 million for a 10% stake in Olympus and, although the main incentive for the investment appears to have been Olympus's medical equipment business, both companies have stated there are ' many potential opportunities for collaboration between Olympus and Sony's digital camera businesses'. We look forward to future developments.

      The E-PL5's sensor is coupled to the TruePic VI dual-core processor, which is the same as the  E-M5's. Accordingly, the E-PL5 supports both JPEG and ORF.RAW file capture with five aspect ratio settings (4:3, 3:2, 16:9, 1:1 and 3:4).

      Raw files are always recorded with maximum resolution at the 4:3 aspect ratio, which is native to the sensor. When an alternative aspect ratio is selected, it's recorded in the image metadata and becomes available when raw files are converted into editable formats.

      JPEG images are cropped to the selected aspect ratio and when shooting RAW+JPEG pairs any JPEG size and aspect ratio combination can be used. The table below shows the typical file sizes. 

      Image size

      Compressed file size

      Name

      Aspect ratio

      Pixels

      F

      N

      Raw

      4:3

      4608 x 3456

      24.5MB

      Large [L]

      4:3

      4608 x 3456

      10.8MB

      4.9MB

      3:2

      4608 x 3072

      9.47MB

      4.31MB

      16:9

      4608 x 2592

      8.06MB

      3.70MB

      1:1

      3456 x 3456

      8.06MB

      3.70MB

      3:4

      2592 x 3456

      6.15MB

      2.77MB

      Middle [M]

      4:3

      2560 x1920

      n.a.

      1.58MB

      3:2

      2544 x 1696

      1.39MB

      16:9

      2560 x 1440

      1.19MB

      1:1

      1920 x 1920

      1.19MB

      3:4

      1440 x 1920

      0.91MB

      Small [S]

      4:3

      1280 x 960

      n.a.

      0.45MB

      3:2

      1296 x 864

      0.41MB

      16:9

      1280 x 720

      0.34MB

      1:1

      960 x 960

      0.34MB

      3:4

      720 x 960

      0.26MB

      The PEN E-PL5 supports the same sensitivity range as the E-M5 with a minimum of ISO 200 and maximum of ISO 25600. With focus locked on the first frame, continuous shooting is supported at up to eight frames/second for up to 19 high-resolution JPEGs or 15 raw frames. When tracking AF is enabled, the frame rate decreases to 3.5 fps.

      Video
      Like the E-M5, the PEN E-PL5 can record movies in two formats. MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 is used for the Full HD and higher-resolution HD files, while the AVI/Motion JPEG format is used for HD and VGA movies. The table below shows the recording options provided.

      File format

      Record mode

      Pixels

      Frame rate

      MPEG-4AVC/H.264

      Full HD Fine

      1920 x 1080

      59.94i (sensor output is ~ 30 fps)

      Full HD Normal

      HD Fine

      1280 x 720

      59.94p (sensor output is ~ 30 fps)

      HD Normal

      AVI/Motion JPEG

      HD

      approx. 30 fps

      SD

      640 x 480

      Users can select any of the P/A/S/M shooting modes to allow camera settings to be adjusted for recording video clips. Shutter speeds are adjustable from 1/30 to 1/4000 second and sensitivity can be set anywhere between ISO 200  and ISO 3200.

      Exposure compensation is not supported and there are restrictions on using some Art Filters, although most can be used as they are for shooting stills. Clip lengths are limited to 29 minutes.

      The camera's AF system works normally in movie mode and all focusing modes are available. Some digital stabilisation is included when movies are recorded, enlarging the image slightly. Frames are also cropped to match the recording mode setting.

      A one-push 4x teleconverter is available for extending zoom coverage in movie mode. There's also a wind-reduction filter in the Movie pages of the Custom settings menu and users can adjust audio recording volumes across three levels: low, standard and high. 

      You can capture one still frame during each movie clip by pressing the shutter button. This splits the movie into two files with the still frame inserted between them.

      Autofocusing
      The E-PL5's autofocusing system has the same 35 AF points as the E-PL3's but gains a new 'FAST' (Frequency Acceleration Sensor Technology) technology that can take advantage of the M.Zuiko MSC (Movie & Still Compatible) lenses to provide fast and near silent autofocusing.  High-speed focusing algorithms work with the TruePic VI to minimise  capture lag.

      Pressing the Info button in AF point selection mode lets you toggle through four AF area selections: all 35 points (the camera chooses from the full set), a nine-point square, a single point and reduced-size single point. Pressing the left button on the arrow pad lets you select a single AF point and position it within the array.

      You can zoom in on part of the frame when adjusting focus, allowing you to use the AF control on a smaller area than is normally covered by a single AF point. Up to 14x zooming is available, enabling focus points to be selected from an array of roughly 490 points.

      Other Features
      TheRelease/Drive page in the Custom menu contains a newLens I.S. Priority setting that prioritises the systems in stabilised lenses over the body-integrated system in the camera. This enables the camera to use, for example, Panasonic lenses and take advantage of their stabilisation systems.

      The built-in Art Filters menu has been expanded to include 12 settings with new Water Colour and Monochrome effects. The Water Colour filter has two settings: Water Colour I eliminates darker areas in the image to show bright colour tones on a white canvas, while Water Colour II represents the contour lines as gradations in colour tone variation. Examples are shown below.
       
       

      Water Colour I
       
       

      Water Colour II

      The Monochrome effect converts blacks and greys in B&W images into sepia, blue, purple or green. Separate yellow, orange, red and green monochrome filter effects are available to reproduce the contrast characteristics of these filters with B&W film. These effects are available with the Grainy Film I/II and Dramatic Tone II filters.

      Colour filters in the monochrome effect menu: top row - sepia, blue; bottom row - purple, green.

      Users can select Art Filters via the touch screen and apply a range of adjustments (colour, contrast, granularity) to the effects.  Art Filter bracketing is also available and users can choose which filters will be applied. The camera records a single shot and then reproduces it with the selected effects, saving each as a separate file.

      Art Filter effects can be applied post-capture to ORF.RAW files using the supplied Olympus Viewer 2 software, although they aren't available for post-processing JPEGs. All Art Filters are available in movie mode.

      Features that remain unchanged include self-timer and bracketing settings, flash modes, the Digital Tele-converter function, white balance modes and playback modes.  Wi-Fi support is available via any of the SD storage/wireless cards. A new Olympus OI. Share social media app is available for iOS and Android devices to take advantage of this capability and enable users to transfer photos to smart-phones and tablets as well as Facebook and Twitter.

      Playback and Software
       Olympus has made few changes from the E-PL3, the main one being the replacement of the Olympus [ib] application with Olympus Viewer 2 (Windows and Mac). It's not a huge improvement on the previous software and most users will wait for third party raw converters, like Adobe Camera Raw, which should appear soon. Otherwise, the playback functions are essentially unchanged.

      Performance
      Not surprisingly, we noticed improvements in many aspects of imaging performance when we compared the shots taken with the E-PL5 with those from its predecessor. Using the camera was also better, partly because of the more comfortable grip but also because of the touch screen controls. Although these aren't as well implemented as those on Panasonic's cameras, they do make it easier to control focus, particularly when shooting on the go.

      We found the E-PL5 great fun to use for street photography, where its small size made it inconspicuous. Improvements to the autofocusing system – which is now genuinely fast – made grab shots possible in situations where most cameras would fail to find focus.

      Exposure metering was also improved and we had no instances of under- or over-exposure, regardless of the lighting conditions.  Highlight and shadow details in wide brightness range subjects contained more detail than we found in our tests on the E-PL3.

      Our Imatest tests were shot with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm f3.5-5.6II R kit lens, which was also used for our review of the PEN MINI E-PM1 in November 2011. (INSERT LINK) Imatest showed a reduction in saturation in JPEG files, compared with the E-PL3, although skin hues still had a slightly warm bias. Overall colour reproduction was good and we expect more sophisticated raw converters will provide even better colour quality than the supplied software.

      The review camera's low-light performance was impressive, with image noise only becoming visible in long exposures at ISO6400 and shots taken at ISO 12800 being printable up to A4 size. By ISO 25600, apparent sharpness and saturation were reduced and pattern and colour noise were visible, although shots were still printable at snapshot size.

      Flash exposures showed similar characteristics. However, as with the E-PL3, the bundled flash, which has a default aperture setting of f/5.6 in flash mode, wasn't powerful enough to produce correct exposures at ISO settings below 800 or compensate for flash exposures with the highest ISO settings. Shots were a stop or two over-exposed at ISO 12800 and ISO 25600.

      Imatest confirmed our subjective observations of image sharpness, showing a gradual decline in resolution as the ISO sensitivity was raised. The graph below shows the results of our tests.

      The kit lens delivered its best resolution a stop or two down from maximum aperture and with short and medium focal lengths. Edge softening was detected at wider apertures and diffraction impacted on resolution from about f/8. The graph below shows the results of our Imatest tests.

       

      Lateral chromatic aberration remained squarely in the 'low' band for almost all focal length and lens aperture settings. In the graph below the red line marks the border between 'negligible' and 'low' CA, while the green line separates 'low' from 'moderate' CA.

       

      White balance performance was slightly better than we found with the E-PL3. The auto setting retained a slight warm cast in incandescent lighting, while under fluorescent lighting the colour balance was close to neutral. The pre-sets over-corrected slightly with both lighting types, leaving a slight blue cast. Neutral colours were obtained with manual white balance measurement.

      Video clips were similar to clips shot with the E-M5 and both the Full HD and HD modes produced equally sharp movies with the High and Normal shooting modes. We couldn't see a significant difference in image quality between the MPEG-4AVC/H.264 and AVI/Motion JPEG clips at 1280 x 720 pixel resolution.

      Audio quality was adequate, although the built-in microphones were quite susceptible to wind noise. The  wind cut filter reduced, but didn’t totally eliminate, wind noise.

      We carried out our timing tests with a 32GB SanDisk Extreme Pro SDHC U1 memory card, which supports 45MB/second data transfer. The review camera took just under a second to power-up.  Shot-to-shot times averaged 0.65 seconds without flash and 2.9 seconds with.

      Average capture lag was 0.15 seconds without pre-focusing, with shutter lag being eliminated when shots were pre-focused. When the touch shutter was used, lag times averaged 0.25 seconds.

      Image processing times were slightly faster than the E-PL3, with Large/Fine JPEGs taking approximately 2.3 seconds, ORF.RAW files taking 2.8 seconds and RAW+JPEG pairs 3.1 seconds on average. In the sequential shooting (burst) mode, we recorded bursts of 10 Large/Super Fine JPEGs in 1.1 seconds. It took 3.2 seconds to process this burst.

      Ten ORF.RAW files were recorded in the same amount of time. It took 4.5 seconds to process this burst. Swapping to RAW+JPEG capture, we recorded 12 pairs in 1.3 seconds. This burst was processed in 12.7 seconds.

      Conclusion
      The E-PL5 is a nice little camera and would be an excellent choice for photographers who want a small and light interchangeable-lens camera with superior overall performance. Olympus has a wide choice of excellent lenses to match it and, if you can't find precisely the lens you want, there's a good chance it will be available from Panasonic or one of the increasing number of third-party manufacturers that have begun to develop lenses for the system.

      Sigma was one of the first with 19mm and 30mm  primes, both with f/2.8 maximum apertures. Tokina and Tamron indicated they would be designing lenses for the Micro 4/3 system at the beginning of this year.

      Buy this camera if:
       - You want a smart-looking mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses, raw file capture plus in-camera image stabilisation and effective dust reduction technology.
       - You'd like Full HD video recording with stereophonic sound.
       - You'd appreciate relatively fast autofocusing.
       Don't buy this camera if:
       - You require a built-in viewfinder and/or flash.
       - You have large hands and/or limited dexterity.

      SPECS

      Image sensor: 17.3 x 13 mm LiveMOS sensor with 17.2 million photosites (16.1 megapixels effective)
      Image processor: TruePic VI
      A/D processing: 12-bit
      Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
      Focal length crop factor: 2x
      Image formats: Stills – ORF.RAW, JPEG (Exif 2.3), RAW+JPEG; Movies – MOV (MPEG-4AVC/H.264), AVI (Motion JPEG); MPO (3D still)
      Image Sizes: Stills – 4:3 aspect: 4608 x 3456, 2560 x1920, 1280 x 960; 3:2 aspect: 4608 x 3072, 2544 x 1696, 1296 x 864;16:9 aspect: 4608 x 2592, 2560 x 1440, 1280 x 720; 1:1 aspect: 3456 x 3456, 1920 x 1920, 960 x 960; 3:4 aspect: 2592 x 3456, 1440 x 1920, 3216 x 2144, 2400 x 2400, 1824 x 2432, 2560 x 1440, 2544 x 1696, 1920 x 1920, 1440 x 1920, 720 x 960; Movies: 1920 x 1080, 60i at 20Mbps; HD: 1280 x 720 at 60p, 30fps, 640 x 480 at 30 fps
      Image Stabilisation: Sensor-shift
      Dust removal: Supersonic Wave Filter
      Shutter speed range: 2 to 1/4000 second plus Bulb and Time exposures; flash synch at up to 1/250 sec.
      Exposure Compensation: +/- 3EV in 1/3, 1/2 and 1 EV steps
      Exposure bracketing: 2, 3, 5 or 7 frames in 1/3, 1/2 and 1 EV steps
      Self-timer: 2 or 12 second delay plus Custom (sets delay times and capture intervals)  
      Focus system: High-speed imager AF (contrast detection) with 35 sensor points
      Focusmodes: Single AF (S-AF) / Continuous AF (C-AF)*9 / Manual Focus (MF) / S-AF + MF / AF tracking (C-AF + TR)
      Exposure metering: 324-area TTL Image sensor metering with Digital ESP multi pattern, centre-weighted average and Spot modes (with highlight/shadow control)
      Shooting modes: i Auto, Program AE (Program shift can be performed), Aperture priority AE, Shutter priority AE, Manual, Bulb, Time, Scene select AE, Art Filter, Underwater wide / macro
      Scene Presets: Portrait, e-Portrait, Landscape, Landscape + Portrait, Sport, Night, Night + Portrait, Children, High Key, Low Key, DIS mode, Macro, Nature Macro, Candle, Sunset, Documents, Panorama, Fireworks, Beach & Snow, Fisheye Conv., Wide Conv., Macro Conv., 3D
      Art Filters: Pop Art, Soft Focus, Pale & Light Colour, Light Tone, Grainy Film, Pin Hole, Diorama, Cross Process, Gentle Sepia, Dramatic Tone, Keyline, Watercolour
      Colour space options: sRGB, Adobe RGB
      ISO range: Auto, ISO 200-25600 in 1/3 or 1EV steps
      White balance: Auto, 7 preset WBs (3000K - 7500K) - Sunny(5300K), Shadow(7500K), Cloudy(6000K), Incandescent(3000K), Fluorescent(4000K), Underwater, WB Flash(5500K); Custom, WB bracketing of 3 frames in 2, 4, 6 steps selectable in A-B/G-M axes
      Flash: Bundled clip on flash FL-LM1; GN=10 (ISO200/m) 
      Sequence shooting: Max. 8 frames/second for 19 high-resolution JPEG or 15 ORF.RAW 
      Storage Media: SD. SDHC. SDXC memory cards; UHS-I, Flash Air  and Eye-Fi Card compatible
      Viewfinder:  VF-2 (optional)
      LCD monitor: Tilting 3-inch LCD capacitive touch-screen with 460,000 dots, 16:9 aspect ratio
      Playback functions: Single-frame, Close-up, Index /Calendar display, Index (4, 9 or 25 frames), Enlarge (2x to 14x), Slideshow with background music and 3 transition effects, Picture rotation (auto mode available), Histogram (independent luminance/RGB available), Shooting information; voice annotation, image overlay (2 or 3 images merging)
      |In-camera editing: RAW development, Gradation auto, Monochrome, Sepia, Red-eye fix, Saturation, Resize (1280x960, 640x480, 320x240), Trimming, Aspect, e-Portrait, Image Overlay, Post-recording
      Interface terminals: USO 2.0, HDMI (Type C Mini); accessory port for optional PP-1, VF-2, MAL-1, SEMA-1 accessories
      Power supply: BLS-5 rechargeable lithium-ion battery; CIPA rated for approx. 360 shots/charge 
      Dimensions (wxhxd): 110.5 x 63.7 x 38.2 mm
      Weight: Approx. 279 grams (body only)

      TESTS

      JPEG image files

       
       

       

      Raw image files converted into 16-bit TIFF format with Olympus Viewer 2.

       

       

      SAMPLES

       

       Auto white balance with incandescent lighting.
       
       

      Auto white balance with fluorescent lighting.
       
       

      40-second exposure at ISO 200; 17mm focal length, f/4.
       
       

      15-second exposure at ISO 1600; 17mm focal length, f/7.1.
       
       

      5-second exposure at ISO 6400; 17mm focal length, f/8.
       

      5-second exposure at ISO 12800; 17mm focal length, f/11.
       

      3.2-second exposure at ISO 25600; 17mm focal length, f/13.
       

      Flash exposure with 42mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/60 second at f/5.6.
       

      Flash exposure with 42mm focal length, ISO 1600, 1/60 second at f/5.6.
       

      Flash exposure with 42mm focal length, ISO 6400, 1/60 second at f/5.6.
       

       
      Flash exposure with 42mm focal length, ISO 12800, 1/60 second at f/5.6.
       

      Flash exposure with 42mm focal length, ISO 25600, 1/80 second at f/5.6.
       

      14mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/160 second at f/5.6.

       
      42mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/125 second at f/6.3.
       

      42mm focal length with Digital Tele-converter, ISO 200, 1/125 second at f/6.3.
       

      Close-up; 42mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/125 second at f/5.6.
       

       23mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/250 second at f/10.
       

       
      21mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/250 second at f/11.
       

      42mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/160 second at f/8.
       

      14mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/40 second at f/9.
       

      42mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/100 second at f/5.6.
       

      42mm focal length, ISO 640, 1/80 second at f/5.6.
       

      14mm focal length, ISO 800, 1/40 second at f/5.
       

      Still frame from MPEG-4 video clip recorded with Full HD resolution (H setting).
       

      Still frame from MPEG-4 video clip recorded with Full HD resolution (N setting).
       

      Still frame from MPEG-4 video clip recorded with HD resolution (H setting).
       

      Still frame from MPEG-4 video clip recorded with HD resolution (N setting).
       

      Still frame from AVI video clip recorded with HD resolution (1280 x 720 pixels).
       

      Still frame from AVI video clip recorded with VGA resolution.

      Additional image samples can be found with our review of the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens.

      Rating

      RRP:  AU$799 for single-lens kit, US$800 (body only) 

      • Build: 8.5
      • Ease of use: 8.0
      • Autofocusing: 8.8
      • Still image quality JPEG: 8.8
      • Still image quality RAW: 9.0
      • Video quality: 9.0

       

      BUY

        No