Fujifilm X-E2


    Photo Review 8.8
    User Rating: 0/10 (0 votes cast)

    Thank you for rating!

    You have already rated this item, you can only rate it once!

    Your rating has been changed, thanks for rating!

    Log in or create a user account to rate.

    Fujifilm X-E2

      In summary

      The X-E2 will appeal to anyone who liked the appearance and functionality of the X-E1. Essentially, Fujifilm has taken a very good Compact System Camera (CSC) and improved it in response to requests from owners of its predecessor.

      Buyers of this camera will be primarily raw shooters who want sophisticated controls in a compact camera body that doesn't compromise on performance and build quality. Its user interface will appeal to traditionalists and serious photographers.  Documentary photographers and photojournalists will appreciate a camera that is responsive and easy to configure.

      The addition of integrated Wi-Fi may please those photographers who require wireless connectivity. However, compared with CSCs from Olympus, Panasonic and Sony, it doesn't offer much more than a Wi-Fi card since no facilities are provided for remotely controlling the camera. But it does provide geotagging capabilities using location data from a smart-phone.

      The availability of  lenses for the X-series cameras has been an issue since the system was launched. Fortunately, Fujifilm is promising some worthwhile additions in the next few months, notably two stabilised zooms (55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 OIS and 10-24mm f/4 OIS).

      One issue that has still to be addressed is raw file conversion. The camera still doesn't offer the option of recording DNG.RAW files and Fujifilm continues to supply the Silkypix-based conversion software with the camera, which doesn't deliver optimal results.

       

      Full review

      Announced in mid-October 2013, Fujifilm's X-E2 is a successor to the X-E1, which was announced just over a year before. Both models feature 16-megapixel APS-C sized sensors and high-resolution electronic viewfinders and both use the same NP-W126 rechargeable lithium-ion battery pack. Like its predecessor, the X-E2 is being offered in silver and black, as shown below. 

      The two colour options for the Fujifilm X-E2. (Source: Fujifilm.)

      Angled view of the Fujifilm X-E2, black version, with the Fujinon XF18-55mm lens. (Source: Fujifilm.)

      Who's it For?
      The X-E2 will appeal to anyone who liked the appearance and functionality of the X-E1. Essentially, Fujifilm has taken a very good Compact System Camera (CSC) and improved it in response to requests from owners of its predecessor.

      Buyers of this camera will be primarily raw shooters who want sophisticated controls in a compact camera body that doesn't compromise on performance and build quality. Its user interface will appeal to traditionalists and serious photographers.  Documentary photographers and photojournalists will appreciate a camera that is responsive and easy to configure.

      The addition of integrated Wi-Fi may please those photographers who require wireless connectivity. However, compared with CSCs from Olympus, Panasonic and Sony, it doesn't offer much more than a Wi-Fi card since no facilities are provided for remotely controlling the camera. But it does provide geotagging capabilities using location data from a smart-phone.

      The availability of  lenses for the X-series cameras has been an issue since the system was launched. Fortunately, Fujifilm is promising some worthwhile additions in the next few months, notably two stabilised zooms (55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 OIS and 10-24mm f/4 OIS).

      One issue that has still to be addressed is raw file conversion. The camera still doesn't offer the option of recording DNG.RAW files and Fujifilm continues to supply the Silkypix-based conversion software with the camera, which doesn't deliver optimal results.

      What's New?
      The X-E2 is almost identical in size and weight to its predecessor but provides more than 60 improvements, implemented as a result of X-E1 users' requests. Some changes are relatively minor, although others provide significant improvements to performance and/or functionality. The most significant of them are:

      - Although resolution remains at 16-megapixels, the second-generation X-Trans CMOS II sensor eliminates the need for an optical low-pass filter and claims to provide better colour reproduction and improved image definition.
       - The new EXR Processor II uses dual CPUs and includes improved algorithms that claim to almost double the processing speed of the previous generation processor, offering 1.8x faster write times. Start-up time is reduced to approximately 0.5 second, with shutter lag at 0.05 seconds.
       - The maximum continuous shooting speed increases from six to seven frames/second and the buffer memory can accommodate up to 28 full-resolution JPEGs or 8 RAF.RAW files. A new continuous shooting mode can record at three frames/second with AF tracking and live view between frames. Conventional playback and file naming have been introduced for images shot in the continuous mode.
       - The new processor also supports 14-bit raw file recording.
       - The selected ISO value is displayed when the AE-L button is pressed.
       - Users can customise the ISO Auto settings by setting maximum sensitivity and minimum shutter speed limits.
       - Phase-detection pixels covering 36% of the centre of the sensor's surface provide faster autofocusing with a claimed speed of 0.08 seconds with the XF14mm f/2.8 R lens in High Performance mode. (But as the High Performance mode must be selected deliberately in the Power Management section of the setup menu, such fast AF speeds won't be apparent in everyday shooting. )
       - AF point selection has been moved to the arrow pad/4-way controller.
       - The 49-point AF sensor array is used in the AF-C mode as well as the AF-S mode.
       - Three different focus-assist options are available for manual focusing: peaking display, magnified view and digital split-image display.
       - Face detection AF/AE can be enabled via menu settings.
       - There are now separate AF-L and AE-L buttons, which are customisable, as well as two  customisable Function (Fn) buttons. Exposure settings can also be adjusted when AE-L is engaged and simultaneous setting of the AE-L/AF-L is possible with the AF-L button.
       - Zoomed-in focus checking with 4x magnification is available in AF mode by pressing the rear Command dial.
       - The monitor screen on the rear panel has been upgraded to a  3-inch colour LCD with 3:2 aspect ratio  and a resolution of approximately 1,040,000 dots.
       - The X-E2 is Fujifilm's first interchangeable-lens camera with 'Lens Modulation Optimiser' technology, which was first introduced in the X100S and X20 cameras in January 2013. This uses a database of XF lens characteristics to correct aberrations and deliver optimal image quality. This function can be de-activated if desired.
       - The exposure compensation  range has been increased from +/- 2EV to +/- 3EV for still shots.
       - Built-in Wi-Fi enables images from the camera to be sent wirelessly to a smart-phone or tablet using  Fujifilm's Camera Application for Android or iOS or shared via a Photo Receiver app that can be installed in the recipient's device. The PC Autosave application also enables images to be saved automatically on a computer via a Wi-Fi network. Camera control isn't supported.
       - The Drive modes now include the multiple exposure settings as well as the continuous shooting, Advanced Filter, bracketing. Motion Panorama and movie modes.
       - Both the LCD and EVF can be turned off to prevent interference from stray light when shooting at night and with very dark scenes. The EVF can be set to activate only via the eye sensor.
       - The ON/OFF switch has been made more resistant to prevent accidental adjustments and the flash pop-up mechanism is improved to provide smoother, more stable deployment.
       - Users can delete zoomed images in Playback mode without having to return to normal viewing size. 'One Touch' zoom playback of deleted images is available in Playback mode. Playback speeds have been improved for reviewing high-resolution images.

      Build and Ergonomics
      If you enjoyed using the X-E1, the X-E2 will feel comfortably familiar as both cameras' bodies are similar in many respects, with the same front and top panel layouts and the same 2,360,000-dot OLED colour viewfinder. Only the rear panel has undergone significant changes. 

      Back views of the X-E1 (top) and X-E2 (below) show the changes made to key camera controls. (Source: Fujifilm.)

      Revisions to the control buttons on the back of the camera (shown above) have been mostly positive and the expansion in the number of programmable buttons (from one to four) will be appreciated by some. Separation of the AF-L  and AE-L controls is another welcome step.

      Useful features that have been retained include the 2.5mm stereo microphone jack, which can also be used for a wireless remote controller, the eye sensor that switches between the monitor and EVF and the Quick menu button. It's a pity the tripod socket is located off the optical axis of the lens instead of hard up against the battery/card compartment. Perhaps next time?

       Top views of the X-E1 (top) and X-E2 (below). (Source: Fujifilm.)

      On the top panel, a new 180X position has been added to the shutter speed dial, indicating the maximum flash synchronisation speed. The A (auto) mark has also been moved to separate it from the other settings. The exposure compensation dial now extends to +/-3EV rather than just +/-2EV.

      Most of the remaining improvements are internal. Additional aids for manual focusing have been added with the Digital Split Image system and Focus Peak Highlighting, which were introduced with the X100s.
       The Digital Split Image system uses data from phase detection pixels on either side of the sensor to split the centre of the field of view. Turning the focusing ring on the lens enables the split images to be merged to being the subject into sharp focus.

      Focus Peak Highlighting uses contrast detection to outline high-contrast edges in a scene, working on the basis that contrast is highest when subject are in focus. No colour options are available for the highlights but the camera offers high and low intensity settings.

      Both focusing aids can be used when framing shots with the monitor and the higher resolution of the upgraded screen provides more scope for checking focus and exposure. Its scratch resistant surface reduces reflections and improves visibility. But it's not a touch-screen and it doesn't tilt; both minor inconveniences.

      The battery is the same as in the X-E1 and it shares a compartment in the base of the camera with the single SD card slot. The metal-lined tripod socket is located beside it, away from the optical axis of the lens.

      Sensor and Image Processing
      The 16-megapixel X-Trans CMOS II sensor is the same chip as used in the X100S and features a colour filter array with a highly randomised pixel arrangement, eliminating the need for an optical low-pass filter (OLPF). This chip includes between 86,000 and 100,000embedded phase detection pixels (depending on which press release you read), which cover just over a third of the chip in its centre and are used for phase-detection autofocusing.

      The sensor is partnered with a second-generation EXR Processor II that features a dual CPU and improved computational performance and claims to provide double the processing speed of its predecessor, the EXR Processor Pro. Fujifilm claims some significant performance benefits from this new processor, including a start-up time of approximately 0.92 seconds and a 'world's fastest' AF speed of 0.08 seconds.

      Note that these figures apply to the camera plus XF27mm f/2.8 lens with the camera in High Performance mode. Using a prime lens reduces the amount by which lens elements must be moved for focusing. Don't expect such fast response times with a zoom lens.

      Other performance claims include a shot-to-shot interval of 0.5 seconds (again with manual focusing) and a shutter lag of 0.05 seconds. After powering off the camera, the X-E2 enters a 'sleep' mode 'for a maximum of 24 minutes. If power is switched on during this time, the camera is ready to shoot in 0.5 seconds.

      The top continuous shooting speed is  seven frames/second with focus and exposure locked on the first frame. Up to 28 JPEG frames can be capture in a burst. A 'Continuous Low' setting is available with a frame rate of three frames/second. In the AF-C mode, the camera can re-focus between frames and users can move the AF point around the frame. Shots are displayed on the monitor screen as they are recorded.

      The X-E2 supports the same image formats, aspect ratio and file sizes as its predecessor, details of which can be found in our review of the X-E1. (INSERT LINK) However, the higher bit depth in the ARW.RAW files (14-bit, compared with 12-bit in the X-E1) should improve image quality overall, particularly at high ISO settings.  Movie options are almost the same as the X-E1's but there's now a choice of frame rates and users can adjust exposure compensation and Film Simulation modes while recording.

      Wi-Fi
       The Fn button on the top panel doubles as a Wi-Fi link that enables images to be sent to a smart-phone or tablet. The Fujifilm Camera Application, which is available from the company's website (http://app.fujifilm-dsc.com/en/) or can be downloaded free from the Apple App or Google Play stores, must be installed in the receiving device to enable the camera to make contact.

      Users can send up to 30 images at a time from the camera to the smart device without entering user IDs or passwords. GPS data from the smart device can also be transferred to the image files in the camera. The system also supports image browsing of pictures or movies on the camera from the smart device and the latter's touch screen can be used to select pictures for download.

      If you want to share images with friends, they must install the Fujifilm Photo Receiver app on their device. Once this is done, images displayed on the camera in playback mode can be shared by selecting them and tapping the Connect tab on the camera and smart device simultaneously.

      Fujifilm also offers a PC Autosave app that lets users transfer images and movies between the camera and a computer using a wireless network. If the Wi-Fi router has a WPS button, no password is required. Otherwise there's a manual setup option for entering the WPS PIN code.

      By default, images are sent to the Pictures folder in the Users section of the computer. The computer will add the camera and launch the web browser, where instructions for saving photographs and movies will be displayed. Up to 10 cameras can be registered.

      Playback and Software
       Nothing much has changed in either area. The playback menu includes the following settings: RAW conversion (to JPEG), image rotate, red-eye correction, Photobook assist, erase selected frames, image search, Panorama and Slide show. You can also mark images for upload, protect, crop and resize shots and tag them as Favourites. On-screen display options include a framing guide, histogram display, depth-of-focus preview, electronic level. Multiple exposures are also supported, along with multi-frame playback (with micro thumbnail).

      The software bundle is the standard Fujifilm offering,  based on the Windows-only MyFinePix Studio, which combines image viewing with basic editing (2D and 3D) and uploading to social networking sites. As noted above, the raw file converter is based on Silkypix technology. It supports both Windows and Macintosh operating systems. Mac users can browse and import images from the camera with Image Capture or other standard Mac OS applications.

      Accessories
       The lens supplied with the camera is the standard Fujinon XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R OIS lens, which we reviewed in November 2012 (INSERT LINK). In Australia, the camera will only be sold with this lens, although it is available as a body-only in the USA for US$999 and in the UK for 800 pounds or EUR 899.

      Optional accessories include a leather case, three dedicated flashguns (EF-X20, EF-20, EF-42), an M Mount adapter (for Leica lenses), hand grip, remote release and protective filters. Currently, there are nine Fujinon XF and XC lenses available with a couple more promised in late 2013 or early 2014.

      Performance
       Image quality from the review camera was every bit as good as we obtained from the X-E1, confirming that Fujifilm's second-generation X-Trans CMOS sensor can deliver excellent image quality. The new EXR Processor II, also a second-generation product appears to have delivered on its promise of providing faster response times, particularly for autofocusing.

      As we reviewed both cameras with the same XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R OIS lens, we felt a comparison between the reviews would be worthwhile and it was no surprise to find JPEG images were slightly soft straight out of the camera but sharpened up nicely in a capable editor like Photoshop because they contained plenty of sharp detail and natural-looking colours. (If you don't want use an editor, it's possible to sharpen JPEGs with in-camera settings.)

      The Dynamic Range Adjustment function worked well as long as it wasn't forced to handle extreme brightness ranges. It seemed to be programmed to prevent highlight blow-out, rather than blocked up shadows but delivered good tonal balances in most situations, as shown in the examples below.

      Once again, we were impressed by the camera's performance at high ISO settings. Our Imatest tests confirmed centre-of-field resolution matched or exceeded expectations for the camera's 16-megapixel sensor at all ISO settings up to ISO 1600 for JPEGs and ISO 3200 for RAF.RAW files converted into 16-bit TIFF format with the Beta version of Adobe Camera Raw. Out of interest, we converted the same series of raw files with the supplied Silkypix software and included the results in our graph below.

       
      Long exposures at night showed little in the way of noise right up to ISO 6400, with a gradual increase in the visibility of noise and overall softening at the ISO 12800 and ISO 25600. A slight loss of colour saturation and blocking up of shadows could be discerned at ISO 25600.

      Flash exposures were even for most of the ISO  range, with obvious under-exposure at ISO 100 and ISO 200 and very slight over-exposure at ISO 25600. The same loss of contrast and softening could be seen in flash shots at the two highest ISO settings as we found for long exposures.

      White balance performance was similar to the results we obtained from the X-E1 and the X-E2 provides the same presets and adjustments for correcting colour casts before shooting. The auto setting failed to totally remove the warm cast from shots taken under incandescent lighting and retained a slight greenish tint under fluorescent lighting. Both presets over-corrected slightly, the various fluorescent lighting settings imparting slightly different colour casts. Manual measurement produced neutral colour rendition.

      Improvements to the autofocusing system were apparent and the review camera was quite quick to focus in the Single AF mode with the three lenses we tested. The slow response of the EVF in the X-E1 also seemed to have been addressed, although some slight delays showed up when tracking moving subjects during movie recordings and the AF system took a while to adjust between near and distant subjects.

      Movie quality was similar to the X-E1's and marred by slow autofocusing, as noted above. The camera's microphones were quite sensitive to wind noise and, although recording levels can be adjusted in the camera's menu, no wind suppression filter is provided. We were unable to test performance with an external microphone.

      Overall response times were faster than the X-E1's in some areas, although not in all. With the 32GB SanDisk Extreme Pro SDHC U1 memory card, the review camera took just under a second to power up but shut down almost instantly. This is the same as we measured for the X-E1.

      We measured an average capture lag of 0.2 seconds, which was eliminated with pre-focusing. Lag times were as long as 0.5 seconds when the lens was seriously defocused. Processing times were slightly faster than we measured for the X-E1, with each file taking 1.6 second to process, regardless of the file type.

      Shot-to shot times averaged 0.9 seconds without flash and 2.1 seconds with. In the high speed continuous shooting mode, the camera recorded 10 full-resolution images in 1.3 seconds, which is close to the specified seven frames/second. It took 5.8 seconds to process a burst of 10 high-resolution JPEGs.  The buffer memory in the review camera seemed able to accommodate between 20 and 24 frames before slowing noticeably, a bit less than the 28 claimed in the specifications.

      When raw file capture was selected, the frame rate remained  unchanged at roughly 7 fps but the capture rates slowed after approximately 9 frames (which is better than specified). It took just over 15 seconds to process this burst. If you switch to the continuous-low mode, which records at three frames/second, autofocusing is available during capture and the buffer can accept between 15 and 16 frames before slowing.

       

      SPECS

       Image sensor: 23.6 x 15.6 mm (APS-C) X-Trans CMOS II with 16.7 million photosites (16.3 megapixels effective)
       Image processor: EXR Processor II
       A/D processing: 14-bit
       Lens mount: Fujifilm X mount
       Focal length crop factor: 1.5x
       Image formats: Stills – RAF.RAW, JPEG (Exif 2.3), RAW+JPEG; Movies – MOV (H.264) with Linear PCM Stereo audio
       Image Sizes: Stills – 3:2 aspect: 4896 x 3264, 3456 x 2304, 2496 x 1664; 16:9 aspect: 4896 x 2760, 3456 x 1944, 2496 x 1408; 1:1 aspect:  3264 x 3264, 2304 x 2304, 1664 x 1664; Motion Panorama L:  Vertical: 2160 x 9600 / Horizontal: 9600 x 1440;  M: Vertical: 2160 x 6400 / Horizontal: 6400 x 1440; Movies: 1920 x 1080 (Full HD) and 1280 x 720 (HD), both at 50p/30p
       Image Stabilisation: Lens based
       Dust removal: Ultra Sonic Vibration of sensor
       Shutter speed range: 1/4000 to 30 seconds plus Bulb (max. 60 min.) and Time (1/2 to 30 sec.), X-sync at 1/180 sec.
       Exposure Compensation: +/-3 EV in 1/3EV increments (+/-2 EV for movies)
       Bracketing: AE Bracketing (+/-1/3EV, +/-2/3EV, +/-1EV), Film Simulation Bracketing (any 3 types), Dynamic Range Bracketing (100% · 200% · 400%), ISO sensitivity Bracketing (+/-1/3EV, +/-2/3EV, +/-1EV)
       Self-timer:  2 or 10 seconds delay
       Focus system: Intelligent Hybrid AF (TTL contrast AF / TTL phase detection AF) with 49 sensor areas (7 x 7)
       Focus modes: Single AF, Continuous AF, MF with Distance Indicator
       Exposure metering: TTL 256-zone metering with Multi, Centre-weighted average and Spot modes
       Shooting modes: Program AE, Shutter-priority AE, Aperture-priority AE, Manual exposure
       Film Simulation modes: Provia/Standard, Velvia/Vivid, Astia/Soft, Pro Neg Hi, Pro Neg. Std, Monochrome, Monochrome+Ye Filter, Monochrome+R Filter, Monochrome+G Filter, Sepia
       Effects filters: Toy camera, Miniature, Pop colour, High-key, Low-key, Dynamic tone, Soft focus, Partial colour (Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Purple)
       Colour space options: sRGB, Adobe RGB
       ISO range: Auto: ISO 200-6400, extension to 100-12800 and 25600 available
       White balance: Automatic scene recognition, Fine, Shade, Incandescent, Fluorescent (daylight, warm white, cool white), Underwater, Custom, Colour temperature setting
       Flash: Manual pop-up flash, GN 7 (m/ISO 200); Auto, Forced Flash, Slow Synchro, Suppressed Flash, Rear-curtain Synchro, Commander modes; red-eye reduction is available
       Flash exposure adjustment: +/-3 EV in 1/3- or 1/2-EV increments
       Sequence shooting: Max. approx. 7 shots/sec. for up to 28 full-resolution JPEGs or 8 RAF.RAW files with Class 10 or higher rated SD card
       Other features: Auto Red-eye Removal, Setting (Colour, Sharpness, D-range, Gradation), Select custom setting, Motion panorama, Colour space, Framing guideline, Frame No. memory, Histogram display, Preview depth of focus, Lens Modulation Optimiser, Pre-AF, Focus check, Focus Peak Highlight, Digital Split Image, Electronic level, Multiple exposure, Fn button setting (RAW, Movie, etc)
       Storage Media: Single slot for SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards; UHS-1 compatible
       Viewfinder: 0.5-in., approx. 2,360,000-dot OLED colour viewfinder with 100% FOV coverage, approx. 23 mm eye point, -4 to +2 dpt adjustment, built-in eye sensor
       LCD monitor: 3-inch 3:2 aspect ratio colour LCD with approx. 1,040,000 dots
       Playback functions: RAW conversion, Image rotate, Red-eye correction, Photobook assist, Erase selected frames, image search, Multi-frame playback (with micro thumbnail), Slide show, Mark for upload, Protect, Crop, Resize, Panorama, Favourites
       Wireless transmitter: Integrated Wi-Fi - IEEE 802.11b / g / n (standard wireless protocol) with support for Geotagging, View & Obtain Images, PC Autosave
       Interface terminals: USB 2.0 High-Speed, HDMI mini connector (Type C), Microphone / shutter release input: 2.5mm stereo mini connector
       Power supply: NP-W126  rechargeable lithium-ion battery; CIPA rated for approx. 350 shots/charge
       Dimensions (wxhxd): Approx. 129 x 74.7 x  37.2 mm (body only)
       Weight: Approx. 300 grams (body only)

       

      TESTS

       JPEG files:

       
       RAF.RAW files converted with Adobe Camera Raw 8.3 (release candidate version).

       
       RAF.RAW files converted with the supplied Silkypix software.

       

      SAMPLES

       
       Auto white balance with incandescent lighting.

      Auto white balance with fluorescent lighting.
       

      18mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/250 second at f/7.1.
       

       55mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/280 second at f/8.
       

      30-second exposure at ISO 100, 24mm focal length, f/7.1.
       
       

      5-second exposure at ISO 1600, 24mm focal length, f/7.1.
       

       
      3.5-second exposure at ISO 6400, 24mm focal length, f/8.
       

       
      3.5-second exposure at ISO 12800, 24mm focal length, f/14.
       

       
      3.2-second exposure at ISO 25600, 24mm focal length, f/16.
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 100, 55mm focal length, 1/30 second at  f/4.5.
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 400, 55mm focal length, 1/30 second at  f/5.6.
       

       
      Flash exposure at ISO 1600, 55mm focal length, 1/30 second at  f/5.6.
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 6400, 55mm focal length, 1/30 second at  f/5.6.
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 12800, 55mm focal length, 1/30 second at  f/5.6.
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 25600, 55mm focal length, 1/30 second at  f/5.6.
       

      Dynamic range with auto setting; 55mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/240 second at f/5.6.
       

      Dynamic range with 400% setting; 18mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/8 second at f/9.
       

      Close-up of a ring-tailed possum using Macro mode: 55mm focal length, ISO 500, 1/60 second at f/5.6.
       

       
      Close-up of a dragon lizard  using Macro mode: 55mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/125 second at f/4.
       

      Close-up using Macro mode: 55mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/640 second at f/5.
       

      48mm focal length, ISO 640, 1/60 second at f/10.
       

       
      55mm focal length, ISO 800, 1/40 second at f/5.
       

      50mm focal length, ISO 640, 1/60 second at f/9.
       

      32mm focal length, ISO 250, 1/60 second at f/5.
       

      55mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/250 second at f/5.6.
       

      55mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/240 second at f/11.
       

      Still frame from Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) video clip recorded at 60 fps.
       

      Still frame from Full HD video clip recorded at 30 fps.
       

      Still frame from HD (1280 x 720 pixels) video clip recorded at 60 fps.
       

      Still frame from HD (1280 x 720 pixels) video clip recorded at 30 fps.
       
       Additional image samples can be found with our reviews of the Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R and XF 27mm f/2.8 lenses.

      Rating

      RRP: AU$1899, US$1399 (as reviewed, with Fujinon XF18-55mm lens)

      • Build: 9.0
      • Ease of use: 8.8
      • Autofocusing: 8.5
      • Still image quality JPEG: 9.0
      • Still image quality RAW: 9.0
      • Video quality: 8.0

       

       

      BUY