Photo Review Reviews section

Olympus E-620

8.3 Rating

A compact, lightweight DSLR camera with built-in image stabilisation and a wide range of adjustable functions.Positioned between the E-520 and the E-30, the new Olympus E-620 is another ‘in-betweener’ model offering features from both cameras. Claimed as the smallest and lightest DSLR with built-in image stabilisation it is smaller by roughly 12 mm in all dimensions and almost 250 grams lighter than the E-30. Despite having the same 12.3-megapixel High-Speed Live MOS Sensor and TruePic III+ image processing engine as the E-30 the E-620 lacks much of the finesse of the higher-priced model.

Nikon D7000

8.8 Rating

A new pro-sumer-level Nikon DX-format DSLR body that offers durability and functionality for serious photographers.Nikon’s widely anticipated D7000 slots into the company’s range between the popular D90 and D300s models. A tempting upgrade for D90 owners, it features a 16.2-megapixel (effective) sensor, new EXPEED 2 image processor and expanded sensitivity range that reaches up to ISO 25,600. A new AF system uses 39 focus points, including 9 cross-type sensors in the centre, while a new 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor underpins the built-in Scene Recognition System.

Nikon D700

9 Rating

Nikon’s second FX-format DSLR combines the D3’s image quality with the D300’s handling characteristics and functionality.Nikon’s D700 is positioned between the ‘pro-sumer’ D300 and the professional D3 models and is the second Nikon DSLR with an FX-format (35mm sized) CMOS sensor. Like the D3 it can use lenses designed for both FX and DX formats and will automatically recognise a DX lens when it is fitted. However, while the D3 includes a 5:4 aspect ratio crop measuring 30 x 24mm, the D700 offers two image area selections: FX format (36 x 24mm) and DX format (24 x 16 mm).

Nikon D60

9 Rating

An entry-level DSLR with many features to help novice users but also a good set of manual controls.Nikon is touting its D60 model as ‘one of the smallest Nikon digital SLRs ever’. Released less than a year after the slightly lighter D40, it’s identical in size and also the same size and weight as D40x that followed. It also has the same 10.2-megapixel CCD sensor and a very similar feature set to the D40x. The review camera was supplied with the new AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR lens, which will be bundled with the camera body and sports a built-in Silent Wave Motor and Vibration Reduction.

Nikon D40X

8.5 Rating

A high-resolution DSLR camera for everyday photographers with most of the same features as the popular D40 model. Nikon’s successful entry-level D40 DSLR has been given an upgrade in the new D40X by replacing the 6-megapixel CCD with a 10.2-megapixel imager, similar to the chip used in the D80 model. The new camera is identical to the D40 in all but a few areas and shares its position as the smallest and most compact DSLR cameras in Nikon’s range (although the D40’s body is20 grams lighter). The bundled kit lens is the same 18-55mm, F3.5-F5.5 AF-S Nikkor as you get with the D40.

Nikon D5000

8.5 Rating

A versatile DSLR that family photographers can learn and grow with.Just over six months after launching the D90 – the first DSLR to offer video capture – Nikon has released a second video-enabled model, the D5000. Positioned between the D60 and D90 models, this new DSLR combines features of them both. It’s priced $200 below the D90 and has the same 12.3-megapixel (effective) resolution but lacks many of the refinements of the higher-priced model.

Nikon D40

9 Rating

A DSLR camera for everyday photographers with a selectable graphic interface that shows users the effect of changing key camera controls. The D40 is Nikon’s smallest and lightest DSLR camera yet – and also the easiest to operate. Designed for everyday photographers, it replaces the D50 model and features the same 6.1-megapixel imager but sports a larger 2.5-inch high-resolution colour LCD monitor. Nikon gives users the choice of three information displays: the classic style found on all Nikon cameras, a new graphic style that shows users the effect of changing controls like lens apertures and a ‘wallpaper’ style that lets owners upload one of their own shots as a background to the data display.

Nikon D3s

9 Rating

The latest iteration of Nikon’s professional DSLR camera adds D-Movie video recording at up to 1280 x 720-pixel resolution.The D3s is the latest professional FX model in Nikon’s DSLR line-up. A small step forward, rather than a major upgrade to the previous D3 series models, the D3s introduces a new sensor and adds a couple of new features but is otherwise almost identical. The most important additions are video recording and sensor-shake dust reduction technology.

Nikon D3100

8.5 Rating

Nikon’s new entry-level DSLR features a 14.2-megapixel sensor and 1080p video recording. The D3100 steps into the entry level position in Nikon’s line-up featuring a new sensor with higher resolution than its predecessor’s and an expanded sensitivity range. It also adds Live View shooting plus Full HD video recording. Autofocusing is supported in Movie mode and the Guide mode settings from the D3000 have been ported into the new model and enhanced with extra functions. The D3100 is also compatible with Nikon’s GP-1 GPS Unit, which is sold separately.

Nikon D300S

8.5 Rating

Nikon’s flagship DX-format DSLR adds D-Movie capabilities and dual card slots to the feature set of the D300.Depending on how you rate the addition of video capture and dual card slots, Nikon’s D300S can be rated as either a major or minor upgrade to the D300. Aside from these features, little has changed from the earlier model. The sensor is the same DX-format 12.3 megapixel (effective) chip and both models include Nikon’s latest EXPEED image processor which is the same as in the D90 (the first DSLR to offer HD video recording).