Nikon D600

9 Rating

An entry-level ‘full frame’ DSLR that provides 24.3-megapixel resolution and offers the option to add a Wi-Fi adapter, GPS module, stereo microphone and remote controller.

Sony DSLR Alpha 55

9 Rating

A capable and compact DSLR camera with some interesting and useful shooting modes and Full HD video recording.In Sony’s about-to-be-released 16.2-megapixel SLT-A55V (which will be known as the A55) DSLR camera, the traditional SLR mirror is replaced with a semi-transparent pellicle mirror that is fixed in place instead of flipping up and down with each exposure. This Translucent Mirror Technology (TMT) technology underpins the new camera’s fast TTL focusing and high burst speeds and makes the new models smaller and lighter than previous models in the Alpha.

Sony DSLR-A850

8.5 Rating

Sony’s 24.6-megapixel pro-sumer ‘full frame’ DSLR offers many features of the company’s flagship model for $1000 less.Sony’s DSLR-A850 provides most of the features of the company’s flagship full frame DSLR A900, but for $1000 less. The sensor is the same 24.6-megapixel CMOS chip and includes the A900’s sensor-shift image-stabilisation mechanism plus Dual Bionz processors. It is also equipped with the same 3.0 inch 921,000-dot transflective Xtra Fine LCD monitor. However, the viewfinder on the A850 provides only 98% frame coverage against A900’s 100%.

Sony DSLR-A550

8.8 Rating

A capable DSLR camera for photo enthusiasts who don’t require support for video recording.Following the release of the entry-level A230, A330 and A380 models in May, Sony announced two slightly more advanced models – the A500 and A550 – in late August at the same time as it unveiled its advanced DSLR-A850 model. We’ve already reviewed the A230, A380 and A850 so it’s interesting to look at the ‘intermediate’ A550, which is pitched at photographers who want a capable, high-resolution DSLR without paying the high price demanded for the ‘full-frame’ models.

Sony Alpha SLT-A65

8.5 Rating

Most of the features of Sony’s new SLT-A77 in a smaller, lighter and more affordable body.The SLT-A65 is the second of two SLR-style interchangeable-lens cameras announced by Sony on 24 August, 2011. Like the SLT-A77, which was unveiled at the same time, it features Translucent (pellicle) Mirror Technology, a 24.3-megapixel APS-C-sized sensor and new BIONZ image processor. Many other features of the A65 are the same as in the higher-featured A77, including the superior XGA OLED Tru-Finder and movie recording capabilities.

Sigma SD15

8.5 Rating

A well-built DSLR camera for photographers who want to work with raw files to obtain maximum image quality.It’s taken a while for Sigma’s SD15 to reach the market. First displayed at Photokina 2008 and then officially announced as a successor to the SD14 on 20 February, 2010, the SD15 has only just gone on sale locally. It offers a few updates to its predecessor but features the same Foveon X3 sensor, which has a focal length crop factor of 1.7x.

Pentax K200D

9 Rating

An affordable, well-built DLSR camera with some worthwhile features for photo enthusiasts.The new Pentax K200D replaces the K100D and is targeted at family users and digital SLR beginners. Although its 10.2-megapixel CCD image sensor has lower resolution than the 14.2-megapixel CMOS chip in the K20D, the entry-level K200D has similar dust- and moisture-proof sealing, the same built-in anti-shake and dust removal and many of the same functions, but a significantly lower price tag.

Pentax K-5

9 Rating

A sophisticated and keenly-priced DSLR camera with controls and functions for knowledgeable and creative photo enthusiasts.The K-5 replaces the K-7 (from which it has evolved) at the top of Pentax’s DLSR range. Little has changed as far as the camera’s body is concerned but beneath the surface lie some significant improvements. The most notable being a new 16.3-megapixel CMOS sensor, which supports a top burst speed of seven frames/second and the widest sensitivity range among current DSLRs.

Nikon D90

8.8 Rating

The first enthusiast-level DSLR camera to support high-definition video recording.It was only a matter of time before one of the camera manufacturers figured out the Live View mode on a DSLR required a video image and then came up with some way to record it. Olympus was hinting at this potential back in January 2006, when the E-330 (the first camera with live viewing) was announced. But Nikon was first to the post with the D90 and Canon is following with the just-announced EOD 5D Mark II.