FIRST LOOK: Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

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      In summary

      When the E-M1 Mark II development announcement was released at Photokina in September we felt this camera was the most exciting piece of equipment to be announced at the show. And we weren’t the only ones, although a poll of readers of the DPReview website nominated the Fujifilm GFX 50S medium-format camera, which was also unveiled in a ‘development announcement’ as their first choice with the E-M1 II a close runner-up.

      While both cameras break new ground, they are quite different ““ and targeted at totally different markets. So we’ll stick with our preference for the following reasons:

      1. The E-M1 Mark II is priced at a level that keen enthusiasts can afford.

      2. It’s also small and light enough to be considered as a ‘go anywhere’ camera.

      3. It’s likely to be faster and more responsive than the medium-format camera.

      4. You get more lenses to choose from ““ and many of them are proven high-level performers.

      If you’ve always regarded M4/3 cameras as too small to be capable, the E-M1 Mark II is likely to change your opinion (unless you are one of those photographers for whom bigger is always more impressive and, therefore, better). This compact little powerhouse will meet the imaging needs of the most demanding user and will exceed your expectations in so many ways.

      Older photographers who are realising how much a full-frame DSLR system can weigh you down (and thereby prevent you from achieving many physical objectives) should take a serious look at the Olympus system, particularly the combination of the E-M1 II and the 12-100mm f/4 PRO lens. We think this combo is a perfect partnership, particularly for travellers.

      And for the young in body and heart, there’s a heap of excitement in this little camera that is well worth exploring. And you may find your shooting skills improve along the way ““ which has got to be a bonus.  

       

      Full review

      The eagerly-awaited Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, which was announced just before Photokina in September, is arguably one of the most sophisticated cameras the company has ever produced ““ which is saying a lot. More compact than any pro DSLR and compatible with a multitude of high-quality lenses, it is faster and more responsive than its predecessor (and many competitors), can deliver higher resolution and also supports professional-level Cinema 4K movie recording.
       

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       The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, shown with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4.0 IS PRO lens that was announced concurrently with the camera. (Source: Olympus.)

      The E-M1 Mark II provides some significant improvements on the original E-M1, which itself was a ground-breaking camera for Olympus. The most noteworthy are shown in the comparison table below.

       

      OM-D E-M1

      OM-D E-M1 Mark II

      Effective resolution

      16.3 megapixels

      20.4 megapixels

      Image processor

      TruePic VI

      TruePic VIII

      Max. image size

      4608 x 3456 pixels

      5184 x 3888 pixels

      Movie sizes

      1920 x 1080 at 30p at 20Mbps/17 Mbps; 1280 x 720 at 30p at 13 Mbps/10 Mbps, HD at 30fps, 640 x 480 at 30 fps

      4096 x 2160 (C4K) at 24p; 3840 x 2160 (4K) at 30p, 25p, 24p; 1920 x 1080 at 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p;    1280 x 720 at 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p  

      Stabilisation

      5-axis IS with yaw, pitch, vertical/horizontal shift and roll along lens axis

      IS modes

      IS Auto, IS1, IS2, IS3, OFF

      S-IS AUTO, S-IS1, S-IS2, S-IS3, OFF

      Shake compensation

      5EV

      5.5EV

      Shutter speeds

      60 to 1/8000 seconds

      60 to 1/8000 seconds; 60 to 1/32000 seconds with electronic shutter

      Exposure Compensation

      +/- 5EV in 1/3, 1/2 or 1EV steps (+/-3EV for movies)

      Exposure bracketing

      2, 3, 5 frames in 0.3, 0.7, 1EV steps selectable, 7 frames in 0.3, 0.5, 0.7EV steps selectable

      Focus system

      High-speed imager AF with 81-area contrast & 37-area phase difference detection

      High-speed imager AF with 121-point cross-type phase detection AF and 121-point contrast AF

      Magnified frame AF

      Selectable from > 800 AF points with 5x, 7x ,10x (default) and 14x enlargement

      5x, 7x ,10x and 14x enlargement

      Focus modes

      Single, Continuous, S-AF + MF, C-AF + TR, Manual focusing

      Single, Continuous, S-AF + MF, C-AF + TR, Manual focusing, AF scanner (3 types); AF targeting pad; face/eye detection AF

      Metering system

      Digital ESP (324-area multi-pattern) TTL Image Sensor metering with centre-weighted average and spot modes plus spot metering with highlight/shadow control

      Shooting modes

      iAuto; Program AE (with Program shift); Aperture priority AE; Shutter priority AE; Manual; Bulb, Time, Scene select AE and Art Filter

      iAuto (Live Guide can be used), Program AE (with program shift), Aperture priority AE, Shutter priority AE, Manual (Live Bulb, Live Time and Live Composite are available), Custom 1~3, Art Filter, Underwater wide / Underwater macro (to be assigned to the Fn1 button)

      ISO range

      Auto, ISO 200-25600 plus LOW (approx. 64)

      Sequence shooting

      Max. 10 frames/sec   for up to 36 RAW frames

      Max. 15 shots/sec.  with mechanical shutter for up to 84 RAW frames or  117 Large/Normal JPEGs; up to 60 fps selectable with Silent sequential shooting H and Pro Capture H modes

      Viewfinder

      Integrated  EVF with approx. 2,360,000 dots; 100% FOV   coverage,   1.30x  to 1.48x magnification, approx. 21 mm eyepoint; -4 ~ +2m-1 dioptre correction, +/- 7 levels each of brightness and colour temperature control

      Monitor

      Tilting 3-inch electrostatic Touch Screen with 1,037,000 dots

      3.0-inch vari-angle monitor with touch controls, 1,037,000-dot resolution

      Battery

      BLN-1

      BLH-1  

      CIPA rating

      330 shots/charge

      440 shots/charge

      Dimensions

      130.4 x 93.5 x 63.1 mm

      134.1 x  90.9  x 68.9  mm

      Body weight

      443 grams

      498 grams

      Physically, the Mark II isn’t hugely different from its predecessor, although it does offer some adjustments that improve handling comfort, such as the larger grip, dual SD card slots and vari-angle monitor screen. Internally, however, there have been some major improvements, which are listed below.

      Who’s it For?
       The asking price gives the first clue; at AU$2,799 (RRP) for the body alone, this camera is   for serious photographers. Olympus developed the new TruePic VIII image processor to match the 20.4-megapixel Live MOS sensor in the E-M1 Mark II, and it shows.

      The 12-100mm f/4.0 IS PRO lens was also developed to match the E-M1 Mark II and together they make a great ‘walkaround’ combination for travellers and anyone who wants a high-performing camera + lens combo that won’t weigh them down. On its own, the camera’s superior capabilities in both still image and video recording will appeal to both professional photographers and serious enthusiasts alike.

      For both, the maximum resolution of 5184 x 3888 pixels will support printing at A2 size, which is as large as most potential purchasers will want. Video shooters should be impressed by the ability of the camera to record 4K movies at both the professional Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI)  resolution standard of 4096 x 2160 pixels per frame and the consumer-level UHD-1 standard, which has a frame resolution of 3840 x 2160 pixels.

      What’s New Physically?
       The Mark II body is noticeably larger and slightly heavier than the Mark I and, like the original E-M1, it will only be available with a black body. (Time will tell whether Olympus chooses to offer a body with silver trim as they did with the Mark I.)

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      Front view of the OM-D E-M1 Mark II with no lens fitted, angled to show the enlarged grip. (Source: Olympus.)

       

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       Top view of the OM-D E-M1 Mark II with no lens fitted. (Source: Olympus.)

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       Rear view of the OM-D E-M1 Mark II with the monitor reversed. (Source: Olympus.)

      The following physical changes are obvious when comparing the Mark II with the original OM-D- E-M1:

      1. The grip has been enlarged to provide even greater comfort and security and make it more comfortable for users with large hands.  

      2. The monitor screen is fully articulated, instead of simply tilting as it did on the original model.

      3. Dual SD card slots replace the single slot on the E-M1. Slot 1 is UHS-I and UHS-II compatible to cater for the high data speeds needed for recording 4K video, Slot 2 is compatible with UHS-I cards. When two cards are inserted, the card to be saved on to or to be viewed can be designated and users can choose from four save-to-card settings: Standard (record to the nominated card), Auto Switch when the first card is full, Dual Independent (different quality/file type to each slot) and Dual Same (same files to each card).

      4. The EVF has the same 2,360,000-dot resolution, magnification, coverage, eye relief and dioptre adjustments as the E-M1’s.  But its refresh rate has been boosted to 120 frames/second (fps) and it has a latency of only six milliseconds, providing a significant improvement in viewing for tracking moving subjects.

      5. A couple of new interface ports have been added, most notably a USB Type-C port and a 3.5 mm stereo mini jack for connecting headphones to the camera to monitor movie audio recordings. The USB 2.0 PC interface has been replaced with a faster USB 3.0 port.

      6. The new BLH-1 battery is larger than the BLN-1 battery in previous OM-D cameras and supports higher shooting capacity (440 shots/charge, compared with 330 shots/charge for the E-M1). Like the EM-1, the E-M1 II can be fitted with an optional battery grip (HLD-9), which can hold an additional BLH-1 battery to double the camera’s shooting capacities.  

      7. Wisely, Olympus has made few changes to the control layout in the new camera, aside from making some minor cosmetic adjustments. All key controls are in the same places as they were on the original E-M1, save for the Menu button which has been shifted to the right and the Playback button, which has moved down a tad. This means photographers can swap between the new and old cameras without having to fret over whether they’ve pressed the wrong button or turned the wrong dial.

      Internally, a lot more has changed and we’ll cover those changes in separate sections below.

      Internal Changes
       Two of the more important internal changes are the replacement of the 15-megapixel sensor by a new 20.4 megapixel chip and the upgrading of the processor to the latest TruePic VIII model. Together, they provide higher resolution and faster burst rates for shooting still pictures and enough speed and capacity to support Cinema 4K video (4096 x 2160 pixels).

      Interestingly, the ISO sensitivity range is unchanged and defaults at ISO 200-25600 with a LOW setting that is equivalent to ISO 64.

      The addition of an electronic shutter option enables users to take advantage of shutter speeds faster than the maximum of 1/8000 second available with the mechanical shutter. This shutter is rated for 200,000 cycles, as befits a professional camera and its re-design has resulted in a softer feel and quieter click than the E-M1’s shutter as well as a reduction in vibrations that can cause shutter shock.

      Faster continuous shooting speeds will be seen as a highlight of the new camera by sports and wildlife shooters. Improvements to the buffer memory capacity will also impress. With the mechanical shutter, the Mark II can sustain a burst rate of 15 fps for up to for up to 84 RAW frames or  117 Large/Normal JPEGs, more than doubling the capacity of the E-M1.

      The electronic shutter can record at 18 fps with AF/AE tracking and 60 fps when AE and AF are locked on the first frame. Up to 105 Large/Normal JPEGs or 77 ORF.RAW frames can be recorded sequentially when the electronic shutter is used at maximum capture rate. The camera also includes a Silent Mode, which disables shutter sounds and electronic sounds for silent shooting.

      The autofocusing system has also undergone a series of revisions and now features a 121-point, all-cross-type sensor, which is available for both On-chip Phase Detection AF and Contrast AF and is supported in both single and continuous AF modes for shooting stills and while recording video clips. A new tracking algorithm makes it possible to continue tracking moving subjects as their position changes in the frame.

      Four AF target modes can be selected: All Target, Single Target, 5-Point Group Target and 9-Point Group Target. The target can be displayed or hidden via customised controls, enabling users to set up the camera to make them available when required. The AF Target mode, AF target position and Face/Eye Priority AF mode can be changed with a single operation and a cluster display that moves with the subject makes it easy to confirm the subject is continuously in focus.  

      Five levels of C-AF tracking sensitivity are available so users can match sensitivity to subject requirements. This system is designed to cope with subjects that are moving towards or away from the camera as well as vertical and horizontal motions. An AF limiter function in the camera lets you set three AF operating areas and users can define the extent of each area for each lens and situation.  

      The camera also allows the monitor screen to be used as an AF Targeting Pad while framing the subject via the viewfinder. When AF Targeting Pad is activated from the menu, a double-tap turns it on or off and you can control the position of the AF target by moving your finger across the screen without removing your eye from the EVF.

      The Mark II includes a new Pro Capture shooting mode that is designed to reduce the already brief capture lag time. In this mode, the camera begins recording 20-megapixel images once the shutter button is half-pressed and will retain up to 14 of the most recent images when the shutter button is pressed all the way down.  Flash use isn’t supported in this mode.

      The High-Res Shot mode introduced in the E-M5 Mark II is also available in the E-M1 Mark II, where it offers the equivalent of 50-megapixel resolution (or 25-megapixels if you need to keep the file size smaller). As before, it causes the camera to move the sensor in half-pixel increments while capturing eight shots, which are then used to generate a single high-resolution shot. It’s unsuitable for use with moving subjects.

      Another multi-shot mode is Focus Stacking, which captures eight frames, shifting the focus  slightly between them and then automatically merges them to form a single image in which the subject is sharp from the foreground to background. This mode is handy for macro shooting and also to obtain a depth of field that goes beyond the smallest aperture setting without being affected by diffraction. Focus bracketing is also available across a range of up to   99 shots and users can select from 10 levels of focus shift.

      Also carried across from previous OM-D cameras is the Live Composite mode, which records for up to three hours, capturing only those areas that are newly bright, thereby avoiding over-exposure which may occur with conventional bulb shooting.  This mode is ideal for capturing star trails. Live Bulb/Live Time and Keystone Compensation are also provided in the new camera.

      The E-M1 Mark II has a new type of in-body 5-axis image stabilisation that compensates for all types of camera shake. When combined with in-lens image stabilisation, 5-axis sync IS provides  up to 6.5 stops of shutter speed compensation with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4.0 IS PRO lens at 100mm.

      Video
       As mentioned, the E-M1 Mark II is the first Olympus camera to support DCI Cinema 4K movie recording and is capable of capturing a 4096 x 2160 pixel frame sequence at a 24 fps frame rate with a 237 Mbps bit rate. The DCI 4K standard has a   1.9:1 aspect ratio and offers more than double the horizontal and vertical resolution of Full HD video.

      But that’s not all; the camera can also record in the consumer-level UHD-1 format with a resolution of  3840 x 2160  pixels, which is close to the 16:9 aspect ratio of widescreen TV sets and computer monitors.  Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) and HD (1280 x 960 pixels) are also supported at frame rates up to 60 fps (NTSC) or 50 fps (PAL), with a choice of ALL-Intra (202 Mbps) and IPB modes. The table below shows the various options available.

      Recording size

      Frame rate

      Bit rate

      4K

      30P, 25P, 24P

      102 Mbps

      Cinema 4K (C4K)

      24P

      237 Mbps

      FHD

      60P, 50P, 30P, 25P, 24P

      ALL-Intra (202 Mbps), SuperFine (52 Mbps), Fine (30 Mbps), Normal (18 Mbps)

      HD

      60P, 50P, 30P, 25P, 24P

      ALL-Intra (102 Mbps), SuperFine (26 Mbps), Fine (10 Mbps), Normal (10 Mbps)

      The camera includes a number of new video features to make it easier to achieve the results you want. The following list outlines the main options:

      1. In movie mode, you can use the Live Super Control Panel to change image quality settings and the image stabilisation mode (M-IS).

      2. The 4K single frame extraction setting lets you extract a single frame from a recorded 4K movie to use as a still image.

      3. A new Flat picture mode is available for video. W9ith this setting, contrast is lowered to prevent highlight blowout and loss of shadow detail for colour grading and adding rich gradations in post-production editing.

      4. Focus peaking is available for video recording to provide easy focus checking. The peaking colour can be selected from white, black, red, and yellow, and its intensity can be selected from low, standard and high.

      5. The Movie Tele-converter provides approximately 3x magnification for zoomed-in shots of the area you touch on the monitor while a clip is being recorded.

      6. Time coding is also supported and users can select from Rec Run, Free Run, Drop Frame/Non Drop Frame. The time code start time can be synced with the actual time or set manually.

      7. The camera can record slow motion or quick motion movies.

      8. The Clips function lets you capture short video clips of a fixed length and combine them together to create a short movie.

      9. All Art Filter options are available for video as well as for stills and you can fade from one Art Filter to another in a single piece of footage.

      10. Other effects include an Old Film Effect and One Shot and Multi Echo effects to imply  motion with afterimages.

      The normal movie limit is 4GB but, if this is exceeded the camera automatically splits and saves the movie file. When playing back the movie on the camera, split files are played as one file.

      The E-M1 Mark II includes an HDMI Monitor connection that supports 4:2:2 output for an expanded colour correction range and users can select between Monitor mode for an external monitor , and Recording mode for an external recorder. When recording simultaneously on the camera, 4:2:0 is upsampled to 4:2:2. During standby when shooting a movie, you can magnify the camera monitor on its own for more accurate focusing.

      Accessories
       In addition to the wide range of Olympus lenses, which are offered in PRO, Premium and regular qualities, users can choose from two dedicated flashes: the FL-900R External Flash (which has a GN of 58) and the STF-8 Macro Flash, both of which are dustproof, splashproof and freezeproof  .

      The HLD-9 Power Battery Holder is dustproof and splashproof power battery holder that is specific to the OM-D E-M1 Mark II. It’s a rather bulky unit that holds a single HLD-9 battery but this will effectively double the camera’s recording capacity.

      The HLD-9 includes a shutter button, dial wheel and arrow pad as well as two dedicated Function buttons that can be programmed via the camera. It allows the camera to be used as easily when holding the camera vertically. An optional GS-5   grip strap and AC-5 AC adapter are available, the latter being recommended when the camera is in prolonged continuous use.

      Conclusion
       When the E-M1 Mark II development announcement was released at Photokina in September we felt this camera was the most exciting piece of equipment to be announced at the show. And we weren’t the only ones, although a poll of readers of the DPReview website nominated the Fujifilm GFX 50S medium-format camera, which was also unveiled in a ‘development announcement’ as their first choice with the E-M1 II a close runner-up.

      While both cameras break new ground, they are quite different ““ and targeted at totally different markets.   So we’ll stick with our preference for the following reasons:
       1. The E-M1 Mark II is priced at a level that keen enthusiasts can afford.

      2. It’s also small and light enough to be considered as a ‘go anywhere’ camera.

      3. It’s likely to be faster and more responsive than the medium-format camera.

      4. You get more lenses to choose from ““ and many of them are proven high-level performers.

      If you’ve always regarded M4/3 cameras as too small to be capable, the E-M1 Mark II is likely to change your opinion (unless you are one of those photographers for whom bigger is always more impressive and, therefore, better). This compact little powerhouse will meet the imaging needs of the most demanding user and will exceed your expectations in so many ways.

      Older photographers who are realising how much a full-frame DSLR system can weigh you down (and thereby prevent you from achieving many physical objectives) should take a serious look at the Olympus system, particularly the combination of the E-M1 II and the 12-100mm f/4 PRO lens. We think this combo is a perfect partnership, particularly for travellers.

      And for the young in body and heart, there’s a heap of excitement in this little camera that is well worth exploring. And you may find your shooting skills improve along the way ““ which has got to be a bonus.  

       

      SPECS

       Image sensor: 17.4 x 13.0 mm 4/3 Live MOS sensor with 21.8 million photosites (20.4 megapixels effective)
       Image processor:  TruePic VIII
       A/D processing: 12-bit lossless compression
       Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
       Focal length crop factor: 2x
       Image formats: Stills: JPEG (DCF Ver. 2.0, Exif Ver. 2.3), ORF.RAW, RAW+JPEG; Movies: MOV (MPEG-4AVC/H.264), AVI (Motion JPEG); Wave Format audio (Stereo linear PCM/16-bit, Sampling frequency 48kHz)
       Image Sizes: Stills ““ 5184 x 3888 to 1024 x 768 pixels;  High Res Shot: Equivalent to 50 megapixels / 25 megapixels (8 shots combined into a single JPEG using sensor shift); Movies: 4096 x 2160 (C4K) at 24p / IPB (approx. 237 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4K) at 30p, 25p, 24p / IPB (approx. 102 Mbps); 1920 x 1080 at 30p, 25p, 24p / ALL-I (A-I), IPB (SF, F, N), 60p, 50p / IPB (SF, F, N); 1280 x 720 at 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p / ALL-I (A-I), IPB (SF, F, N); [AVI] 1280 x 720 at 30p
       Image Stabilisation: Built-in 5-axis sensor-shift image stabilisation for movie and still photos; 4 modes (S-IS AUTO, S-IS1, S-IS2, S-IS3), OFF; 5.5 EV shake compensation
       Dust removal: Supersonic Wave Filter
       Shutter (speed range): Focal plane mechanical and electronic shutter (mechanical shutter: 1/8000 – 60 sec.; Electronic first curtain shutter (Anti-shock mode): 1/320 – 60 sec.; Electronic shutter (Silent mode): 1/32000 – 60 sec.; flash synch at 1/250 sec.
       Exposure Compensation: +/- 5EV in 1/3, 1/2 or 1EV steps (+/-3EV for movies)
       Exposure bracketing: 2, 3 or 5 frames in 0.3 / 0.7 / 1.0 EV steps selectable, 7 frames in 0.3 / 0.7EV steps selectable
       Other bracketing options: ISO, WB, Flash, Art filter, Focus (3 to 999 shots plus Focus stacking)
       Self-timer: 2 or 12 seconds delay plus Custom (Wait time: 1-30sec., Shot interval: 0.5 / 1 / 2 / 3sec., Number of shots: 1-10, Every time AF: ON/OFF)
       Focus system: Imager phase detection AF and imager contrast AF (active AF automatically selected by camera; when a Micro Four Thirds lens is attached, imager phase detection AF is always selected)
       AF points & selection:121-point cross-type phase detection AF and 121-point contrast AF; All target, group target (9-area or 5-area), single target
       Focus modes: Single AF (S-AF) / Continuous AF (C-AF) / Manual Focus (MF) / S-AF + MF / AF tracking (C-AF + TR) / Preset MF; C-AF lock (5 steps), AF scanner (3 types); AF targeting pad; AF limiter; 3x , 5x , 7x , 10x , 14x Magnified frame AF; face/eye detection AF; Manual focus assist (magnification and peaking)
       Exposure metering:   Digital ESP metering (324-area multi pattern metering), centre-weighted average and spot metering patterns plus spot metering with highlight control, spot metering with shadow control
       Shooting modes: iAuto (Live Guide can be used), Program AE (with program shift), Aperture priority AE, Shutter priority AE, Manual (Live Bulb, Live Time and Live Composite are available), Custom 1~3, Art Filter, Underwater wide / Underwater macro (to be assigned to the Fn1 button)
       Picture modes: i-Enhance, Vivid, Natural, Muted, Portrait, Monotone, Custom, e Portrait, Underwater, Colour Creator, Art Filters; Auto, Normal, High Key, Low Key Gradation; +/- 7 steps each for highlight, shadow, midtone control
       Art Filters: Pop Art (I, II / a.b.c.d.e.f), Soft Focus ( – / c.e), Pale & Light Colour (I, II / a.b.c.d.f), Light Tone ( – / d.f), Grainy Film (I, II / b.c.d.g.h), Pin Hole (I, II, III / d), Diorama ( I,II / d), Cross Process (I, II / b.c.d.f), Gentle Sepia ( – / a.b.c.d.f), Dramatic Tone (I / b.c.d.e.f) (II / b.c.d.e.f.g.h), Key Line (I, II / a.b.c.d.e), WaterColour (I, II / a.b.c.d), Vintage (I, II, III / a.b.c.d.e.f.i), Partial Colour (I, II, III / a.b.c.d.e.f), plus 9 Art Effect settings and Colour Ring (for partial colour) with 18 selections
       Other shooting modes: HDR1, HDR2 (painting-like) plus bracketing of   3 or 5 frames in 2.0 or 3.0 EV steps, or 7 frames in 2.0 EV steps for HDR post process; Keystone Compensation; Live Bulb and Live Time, Live Composite, interval shooting, multi-exposure, multi-aspect (4:3 (Default) / 3:2 / 16:9 / 1:1 / 3:4), One push Tele-converter (x2 magnification)
       Colour space options: sRGB and Adobe RGB
       ISO range: Auto (default) : LOW (approx. 64) “ 6400 with customisable upper limit (200 – 6400) with extension to ISO 25600 available; adjustable in 1/3 or 1 EV steps
       White balance: Auto, 7 Preset WBs, 4 Capture WBs, Custom WB (Kelvin setting); +/- 7 steps of Blue/Amber, Magenta/Green bias adjustments
       Flash: Bundled FL-LM3 (dustproof and splashproof flash); GN = 9.1 (ISO100・m)
       Flash modes: Redeye, Fill-in, Flash Off, Red-eye Slow sync. (1st curtain), Slow sync. (1st curtain), Slow sync. (2nd curtain), Manual (1/1 (FULL) ~ 1/64)
       Flash exposure adjustment: +/- 3 EV in 1/3, 1/2, 1 EV steps
       Sequence shooting: Max. 15 shots/sec.   with mechanical shutter; up to 60 fps selectable with Silent sequential shooting H and Pro Capture H modes
       Buffer capacity: Max. 117 Large/Fine JPEGs, 84 RAW files in Sequential shooting H 15 fps mode
       Storage Media: Dual slots for SD, SDHC, SDXC cards (Slot1: UHS-I, II compatible, Slot2: UHS-I compatible)
       Viewfinder: Eye-level  EVF with approx. 2,360,000 dots; 100% FOV   coverage,   1.30x  to 1.48x magnification, approx. 21 mm eyepoint; -4 ~ +2m-1 dioptre correction, +/- 7 levels each of brightness and colour temperature control
       LCD monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle monitor with touch controls, 1,037,000-dot resolution,  +/- 7 levels each of brightness and colour temperature adjustments, Vivid / Natural colour tone
       Playback functions: Single-frame, information display, index display (4/9/25/100 frames), Clips, calendar, enlargement (2x – 14x), movie (with sound, FF/REW/Pause), picture rotation (auto), slideshow (with sound including BGM, Slide show effects, replaceable BGM), Light Box display, basic movie and stills editing: ARW.RAW data edit based on camera settings, Gradation auto, Monochrome, Sepia, Red-eye fix, Saturation, Resize (1280 x 960, 640 x 480, 320 x 240), Trimming, Aspect, e-Portrait, Image Overlay, Post recording
       Interface terminals: USB Type-C, Micro HDMI (type D), 2.5mm remote control jack, 3.5 mm stereo mini jack (microphone), 3.5 mm stereo mini jack (headphone), Super Speed (USB3.0) PC interface
       Wi-Fi function: Built-in (IEEE 802.11b/g/n) with QR code connection; Connect to up to 4 devices simultaneously; Marking function for image share of JPEG & MOV files; wireless camera control supported plus geotagging via smartphone GPS data
       Power supply: BLH-1  rechargeable Li-ion battery pack; CIPA rated for approx. 440 shots/charge
       Dimensions (wxhxd): Approx. 134.1 x  90.9  x 68.9  mm (excluding protrusions)
       Weight: Approx. 498  grams (body only); 574 grams with battery and card  

      RRP: AU$2,799; US$2,000  
      Distributor: Olympus Imaging Australia; 1300 659 678, www.olympus.com.au  

       

      SAMPLES

       The sample images below were taken with the M.Zuiko Digital 12-100mm f/4 PRO lens. We’ve included some sample frames from video clips shot with the camera. More will be provided when a production unit is available for us to review.  

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      12mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/200 second at f/7.1.
       

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      54mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/640 second at f/10.
       

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      75mm focal length, ISO 640, 1/160 second at f/4.
       

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      29mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/125 second at f/6.3.
       

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      50mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/100 second at f/8.
       

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      100mm focal length, ISO 800, 1/125 second at f/5.
       

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      Before in-camera keystone correction;12mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/60 second at f/5.6.
       

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      After in-camera keystone correction;12mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/60 second at f/5.6.
       

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      These three images show (from left) a shot taken without in-camera HDR adjustments, the same subject photographed with the HDR1 setting and then with the HDR2 setting. 23mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/250 second at f/9.
       

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      24mm focal length, ISO 2500, 1/60 second at f/9.
       

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      Stabilisation test; 38mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/4 second at f/6.3.
       

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      Stabilisation test; 86mm focal length, ISO 200, 0.77 second at f/8.
       

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      Stabilisation test; 100mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/5 second at f/9.
       

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      41mm focal length, ISO 800, 1/20 second at f/9.
       

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      12mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/5 second at f/9.
       

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      12mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/50 second at f/8.
       

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      50mm focal length, ISO 6400, 1/100 second at f/9.
       

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      38mm focal length, ISO 6400, 1/30 second at f/8.
       

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      12mm focal length, ISO 6400, 1/50 second at f/9.
       

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      12mm focal length, ISO 3200, 1/80 second at f/10.
       

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       Still frame from Cinema 4K (4096 x 2160 pixel) movie clip recorded at 24p.
       

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       Still frame from UHD 4K (3840 x 2160 pixel) movie clip recorded at 24p.
       

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       Still frame from Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixel) movie clip recorded at 50p.
       

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      Still frame from  HD (1280 x 720 pixel) movie clip recorded at 50p.
       

      Additional image samples can be found with our review of the  M.Zuiko Digital ED 30mm f/3.5 Macro lens.

       

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