Olympus E-3

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/olympus-e-3/

A solidly-built, professional-quality DSLR for Four Thirds system enthusiasts.Olympus is targeting professional photographers and ‘advanced enthusiasts’ with its E-3 DSLR model, which replaces the four-year-old E-1, the world’s first Four Thirds system DSLR. However, the promise of smaller, lighter cameras claimed for the Four Thirds system is not delivered in the E-3, which is one of the heaviest DSLR bodies in the under-$5000 category. (Only Nikon’s D200 and D300 weigh more.) But size and weight aren’t the only factors influencing camera choice and the E-3 has plenty to recommend it.

Olympus E-620

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/advanced/olympus-e-620/

A compact, lightweight DSLR camera with built-in image stabilisation and a wide range of adjustable functions.Positioned between the E-520 and the E-30, the new Olympus E-620 is another ‘in-betweener’ model offering features from both cameras. Claimed as the smallest and lightest DSLR with built-in image stabilisation it is smaller by roughly 12 mm in all dimensions and almost 250 grams lighter than the E-30. Despite having the same 12.3-megapixel High-Speed Live MOS Sensor and TruePic III+ image processing engine as the E-30 the E-620 lacks much of the finesse of the higher-priced model.

AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR Lens

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-lenses/dslr-lenses-aps-c/af-s-nikkor-24-120mm-f4g-ed-vr-lens/

A versatile, but quite expensive, 5x standard zoom lens that covers a popular focal length range for general photography.Announced in mid-September 2010, the AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR is an update to the popular 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6 VR that features a constant f/4 maximum aperture across the focal length range. Designed for Nikon’s FX (36 x 24 mm sensor) cameras, it is also usable with the company’s DX models, where it covers a focal length range equivalent to 36-180mm.

Printing Raw Files

https://www.photoreview.com.au/tips/outputting/printing-raw-files/

If you own a digital SLR (DSLR) camera – or a high-end compact digicam – you will find it provides two file format settings: JPEG and raw (often shown as RAW). When you shoot a JPEG image, the camera’s image processor with adjust the contrast, sharpness, colour saturation and white balance BEFORE the image is saved to the memory card. When you shoot a raw image, this processing is deferred until the file is opened in a computer.