Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF2

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/advanced-compact-cameras/interchangeable-lens/panasonic-lumix-dmc-gf2/

An update to the popular GF1 that is smaller and features a redesigned interface with touch-screen controls.Panasonic’s Lumix DMC-GF2 arrives in retail stores in January 2011, roughly 15 months after we reviewed its predecessor, the GF1. The new model, which will be available in black or white, has the same rangefinder-like styling as its predecessor but is targeted at everyday photographers instead of photo enthusiasts. Accordingly, its user interface has been simplified and a touch-screen interface replaces many button and dial controls.

Olympus E-520

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/advanced/olympus-e-520/

An affordable, compact DSLR camera with built-in image stabilisation and live view support.Like the recently-released E-420, the new Olympus E-520 is an update of a previous model and doesn’t introduce any radically new features or functions. The tenth Olympus DSLR and the third in the 500 series, it has the same 10-megapixel imager as the E-510 with a few tweaks to the stabilisation and autofocus systems to improve handling and performance. Like its predecessor, the E-520 is targeted at photo enthusiasts.

Olympus E-5

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/pro/olympus-e-5/

A new flagship DSLR with upgraded resolution and image processing plus a larger, higher-resolution monitor.When Olympus unveiled its E-5 DSLR shortly before Photokina in mid-September 2010 it was seen as an affirmation of the company’s commitment to the Four Thirds System format. Despite a gap of three years between E-series models, the E-5 has the same rugged body as the E-3 and many similar (or identical) features. Overall, it can be seen as a relatively modest upgrade.

Olympus E-30

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/advanced/olympus-e-30/

A feature-rich Four Thirds System DSLR for photo enthusiasts.Designed for photo enthusiasts and amateur photographers who want a more sophisticated camera, the new Olympus E-30 is the first in a series of ‘double-digit’ models that will slot in between the ‘three-digit’ entry-level models and the professional ‘single-digit’ camera. The new camera’s 12.3-megapixel Live MOS sensor replaces the 10-megapixel imager currently used across the company’s DSLR range. The E-30 also features a new image processor.

Olympus E-3

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/olympus-e-3/

A solidly-built, professional-quality DSLR for Four Thirds system enthusiasts.Olympus is targeting professional photographers and ‘advanced enthusiasts’ with its E-3 DSLR model, which replaces the four-year-old E-1, the world’s first Four Thirds system DSLR. However, the promise of smaller, lighter cameras claimed for the Four Thirds system is not delivered in the E-3, which is one of the heaviest DSLR bodies in the under-$5000 category. (Only Nikon’s D200 and D300 weigh more.) But size and weight aren’t the only factors influencing camera choice and the E-3 has plenty to recommend it.

Olympus E-620

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/advanced/olympus-e-620/

A compact, lightweight DSLR camera with built-in image stabilisation and a wide range of adjustable functions.Positioned between the E-520 and the E-30, the new Olympus E-620 is another ‘in-betweener’ model offering features from both cameras. Claimed as the smallest and lightest DSLR with built-in image stabilisation it is smaller by roughly 12 mm in all dimensions and almost 250 grams lighter than the E-30. Despite having the same 12.3-megapixel High-Speed Live MOS Sensor and TruePic III+ image processing engine as the E-30 the E-620 lacks much of the finesse of the higher-priced model.

AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR Lens

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-lenses/dslr-lenses-aps-c/af-s-nikkor-24-120mm-f4g-ed-vr-lens/

A versatile, but quite expensive, 5x standard zoom lens that covers a popular focal length range for general photography.Announced in mid-September 2010, the AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR is an update to the popular 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6 VR that features a constant f/4 maximum aperture across the focal length range. Designed for Nikon’s FX (36 x 24 mm sensor) cameras, it is also usable with the company’s DX models, where it covers a focal length range equivalent to 36-180mm.

Printing Raw Files

https://www.photoreview.com.au/tips/outputting/printing-raw-files/

If you own a digital SLR (DSLR) camera – or a high-end compact digicam – you will find it provides two file format settings: JPEG and raw (often shown as RAW). When you shoot a JPEG image, the camera’s image processor with adjust the contrast, sharpness, colour saturation and white balance BEFORE the image is saved to the memory card. When you shoot a raw image, this processing is deferred until the file is opened in a computer.