Pentax K20D

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/pentax-k20d/

A ruggedly-built, high-resolution DSLR with live viewing plus some innovative and useful shooting functions.Pentax has designed its 14.6-megapixel K20D model to appeal to demanding photo enthusiasts but many of its features will also appeal to professional photographers. Like the earlier K10D model, the K20D is built to resist dust and moisture with seals protecting 74 different parts of the camera body. Physically the two cameras are similar, with identical body dimensions, although the new model has a larger LCD and is five grams heavier than its predecessor.

Canon EOS 500D

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/advanced/canon-eos-500d/

A capable DSLR for photographers who require a broad range of adjustable functions plus Full HD video recording.Announced in late March, Canon’s EOS 500D is another ‘in-betweener’ model, like the Nikon D5000 and Olympus E-620 we reviewed recently. Positioned between the 450D and the 50D, the EOS 500D offers the same effective resolution of 15.1 megapixels as the EOS 50D, the same DiG!C 4 image processor and the same Full High Definition movie recording capabilities as the EOS 5D Mark II.

Panasonic Lumix G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH Lens (H-H014E)

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/lenses/m4-3/panasonic-lumix-g-14mm-f25-asph-lens-h-h014e/

A fast, lightweight ‘pancake’ prime lens for Micro Four Thirds System cameras.Panasonic’s Lumix G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH lens was released roughly a year ago with the GF2 camera body. A fast and compact, ‘pancake-styled’ prime lens, it is also offered with the new GF3 camera and bundled in the single-lens kit, which has an RRP of $899, where it represents great value for money. If you buy this lens on its own, however, the RRP is $649, which will probably deter potential buyers.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ10

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/other-cameras/panasonic-lumix-dmc-tz10/

A lightweight, 12x zoom camera for travellers who want advanced shooting controls plus 720p HD video recording.Offering 12.1-megapixel resolution plus a 12x optical zoom lens that covers the equivalent of 25-300mm focal length range, Panasonic’s Lumix DMC-TZ10 extends the appealing features of previous ‘Travellers’ Zoom’ models with a built-in GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver and P, A, S and M shooting modes. Its image stabiliser has been upgraded to a new POWER O.I.S. (Optical Image Stabiliser) with twice the steadiness of previous systems.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/advanced-compact-cameras/interchangeable-lens/panasonic-lumix-dmc-gh1/

A sophisticated ‘hybrid’ camera that combines SLR-like controls for still capture with HD video plus stereo sound recording.Like some of the most recent DSLRs, Panasonic’s new DMC-GH1 offers the added benefit of high-definition video capture – but also provides stereo sound recording. First shown at Photokina 2008, the GH1 is based on Panasonic’s first Micro Four Thirds System (MFT) camera, the DMC-G1, and offers most of the same features for still capture. Unlike the G1, which came in black, red and blue, the GH1 will only be sold locally with a black body. In line with their MFT design, both cameras lack reflex mirror viewfinders but they provide the interchangeable lenses and sophisticated controls of the DSLR format in smaller, lighter bodies and are offered with MFT lenses.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ18

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/advanced-compact-cameras/panasonic-lumix-dmc-fz18/

A lightweight digicam with an optically-stabilised 18x optical zoom lens, RAW+JPEG support and a full range of adjustments.Successor to the successful FZ8 model, Panasonic’s latest long-zoom digicam, the DMC-FZ18 sports an 8-megapixel imager and a massive 18x Leica DC Vario-Elmarit lens that covers an equivalent focal length range from 28mm to 504mm. Otherwise the two models are superficially quite similar, although the FZ18’s image stabiliser is accessed via the menu instead of through a dedicated button. Internally some sigificant changes have been made in the newer model.

FIRST LOOK: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/advanced-compact-cameras/interchangeable-lens/first-look-panasonic-lumix-dmc-gx1/

A feature-rich, customisable, G-Micro series camera designed for photo enthusiasts.The latest addition to Panasonic’s popular Lumix G Micro System range has been designed to provoke interest among photo enthusiasts. The new GX1, which will be available locally early in 2012, is the company’s most feature-rich and photographer-friendly model to date. Equipped with the 16-megapixel Live MOS sensor introduced in the G3, it boasts a new rangefinder design, a mode dial and several customisable controls.

Nikon Coolpix P500

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/advanced-compact-cameras/fixed-lens/nikon-coolpix-p500/

A smart-looking digicam with a 36x zoom Nikkor lens, 12.1-megapixel, back-illuminated CMOS sensor and Full HD video recording. Nikon’s 12-megapixel Coolpix P500, which was announced in early February, is the higher-featured model of two that replace the Coolpix P100, which has been on sale for roughly a year. Featuring a back-illuminated CMOS sensor, it boasts a 36x zoom Nikkor lens, the longest so far in a Coolpix camera. It spans focal lengths from the equivalent of 22.5mm at the wide position to 810mm at full tele zoom.

Canon EOS 1000D

https://www.photoreview.com.au/reviews/dslr-cameras/entry-level/canon-eos-1000d/

A competitively-priced entry-level DSLR that provides a good price/performance ratio for first-DSLR buyers.Replacing the popular EOS 400D at the entry level of Canon’s DSLR range, the EOS 1000D brings yet another level to Canon’s DSLR nomenclature, reflecting the days of film, when Canon’s lowest-priced SLR cameras had four-figure model names. The 1000D has been designed for photographers who want to upgrade from a digicam to a more capable, better performing DSLR. It boasts the same 10.1-megapixel imager as the 400D but is smaller and lighter and supports Live View shooting.

Printing Raw Files

https://www.photoreview.com.au/tips/outputting/printing-raw-files/

If you own a digital SLR (DSLR) camera – or a high-end compact digicam – you will find it provides two file format settings: JPEG and raw (often shown as RAW). When you shoot a JPEG image, the camera’s image processor with adjust the contrast, sharpness, colour saturation and white balance BEFORE the image is saved to the memory card. When you shoot a raw image, this processing is deferred until the file is opened in a computer.