Nikon D3X

    leadpic_Nikon_D3X_50

    Photo Review 9
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    Nikon D3X

      In summary

      A professional DSLR that rivals medium format cameras in imaging performance.When Nikon unveiled its new D3X DSLR camera on 1 December, it was to mixed reactions. Launched as a successor to the popular Nikon D3, which was released in November 2007, it offers roughly double the resolution of the D3 (and the D700, which uses the same sensor). However, when its price tag was revealed a couple of weeks later, many reviewers were less than impressed. The reason: the D3X is in many respects identical to its sibling, but you're paying a high price for all those extra pixels. . . [more]

      Full review

      leadpic_Nikon_D3X_50
      D3X_front

      Front view of the D3X body showing the mirror and lens mount. (Source: Nikon.)

      D3_D3X_Mgbody_1_l

      The magnesium alloy chassis of the D3X. (Source: Nikon.)

      D3_D3X_Sealed_front_l

      The above diagram shows the position of the weatherproof seals that protect the camera against dust and moisture. (Source: Nikon.)

      D3X_back

      Back view, showing the LCD monitor, rear control panel and button controls. (Source: Nikon.)

      D3X_85_top

      Top view showing the top control panel, release mode dial and flash hot-shoe. (Source: Nikon.)
      Despite being 20 grams lighter than the D3, the D3X remains a large and heavy camera. As such, it's designed for serious professionals but targeted specifically at those whose clients require huge image files, such as studio and architectural photographers - and photographers who shoot top-drawer weddings and events.
      To achieve these objectives, you must sacrifice burst capture speed so it won't suit sports photographers, who might otherwise have benefited from the rugged, weatherproof body construction (which is still available with the D3). Either camera would also suit available-light photographers who are tough on equipment, such as photojournalists and wildlife photographers - provided they also invested in Nikon's professional lenses and other accessories.
      In today's economic environment, the asking price of $13,999 for the D3X body is likely to limit sales, both locally and in other countries. But, for photographers who require the features and capabilities the new model offers, it could mean money well spent, particularly since the same economic turmoil is likely to slow the rate of new model releases - at least for a while. (However, with the annual PMA International Trade Show opening in Las Vegas on 3 March, one or two competing models may be in the offing.)
      As you can see from the tables in the Sensor and Image Processing section below, high-resolution files from the D3X are huge. Each Large TIFF file recorded with the camera will take up an average of 73.5MB, while uncompressed 14-bit NEF.RAW files are typically between 50MB and 60MB in size. Even opting for losslessly-compressed raw files will use up more than 35MB of memory. Furthermore, when you convert NEF.RAW files into 16-bit TIFFs, you end up with files that are around 140MB in size.
      The obvious conclusion is that to justify purchasing the D3X, photographers will require clients who are prepared to pay for the large files it produces - and that means a premium over the D3 images and those from cheaper cameras with similar resolution. Photographers who buy and use this camera will also need to think very seriously about their storage options - and back-up strategies. The dual UDMA-compatible CF slots and flexibility in using them (carried over from the D3) will be particularly valuable with the new model - as will the ever-increasing capacity and speed of the latest CF cards.

      Sensor and Image Processing
      The major difference between the D3X and the D3 is the image sensor. Although both cameras use CMOS sensors, the D3X has double the effective resolution of the D3, offering a massive 24.5 megapixels. Since the camera was announced last December, Nikon has publicly acknowledged Sony as the manufacturer of the sensor chip, although it claims the D3X's sensor is 'unique' and 'developed expressly for the D3X'.

      D3X_Sensor_unit

      The D3X's sensor unit. (Source: Nikon.)
      Nikon - and also Sony - are actually being a bit misleading when they quote the effective resolution of the D3X as 24.5 megapixels and the A900 as 24.6 megapixels. For both cameras, it's actually 24.386 megapixels if you multiply the pixel dimensions of the largest file size (6048 x 4032 pixels). But that's essentially nit-picking and the difference between these models and the Canons, which produce 5616 x 3744 pixel images, is effectively negligible so you need to look at other factors when comparing them.
      In the case of the D3X, that means the EXPEED Image Processing system and its associated technologies - all of which appear to have been developed by Nikon. Unfortunately, Nikon provides no information about how characteristics like reproduction of fine detail, dynamic range expansion and high ISO image quality are controlled in the new camera so there's not much we can add here.
      While considering the value-for-money aspects of the DX3, Photo Review prepared a comparison table showing all the current DSLRs with 36 x 24mm image sensors, looking at significant parameters such as the differences in resolution, ISO range, burst rate, body weight and current RRP. It's too large to include in this review but can be viewed by clicking here.

      From this table you can see that the key features sacrificed in the shift from 12.1- to 24.5-megapixels are continuous shooting speed and sensitivity. Whereas the D3 has a top burst speed of nine frames/second (11 fps with the DX format crop), the D3X is limited to five frames/second (7 fps in DX format), which is similar to its main competitors. But burst speed isn't the reason most photographers would buy the D3X; image quality is.
      For a broader perspective on this factor, we recommend consulting the DxOMark Image Quality Database (www.dxomark.com). With this online tool, you can compare a wide range of cameras and discover that the D3X is currently the top performer of all cameras tested- including four high-profile, medium format models. This means the best '35-mm-sized' DSLRs are providing real competition for much pricier medium format cameras with larger image sensors. And, given their easier handling and greater versatility, this could mean a shift in professional photographers' shooting preferences away from medium format to the 'smaller' DSLRs.
      Most photographers and reviewers were amazed by the image quality delivered by the Nikon D3, particularly at high ISO settings. This was the camera that introduced the possibility of shooting with sensitivity settings as high as ISO 25,600 - and obtaining sharp and detailed images. What's more, images captured by this camera were almost film-like in quality, with smooth tonal gradations, natural-looking colours and an abundance of fine detail - even at ISO 25,600, where the noise actually resembled film grain.
      Shooting at ISO 25,600 simply isn't possible with the DX3 because of its substantially smaller photosites, which impose a sensitivity limit of ISO 6400. Limited high-ISO capabilities won't trouble studio photographers, most of whom will never want sensitivities higher than ISO 100. But it will restrict the usability of the camera for available-light shooting in low light conditions. On the plus side, the D3X ranges down to ISO 50, whereas the D3's low sensitivity limit was ISO 100.
      The D3X provides the same range of image size and quality options as the D3, albeit at higher resolutions but the D3X's buffer is significantly larger than the D3's. TIFF file capture is supported at 24-bits (8-bit RGB) and photographers can choose between 12-bit and 14-bit for NEF.RAW files. Three raw capture options are provided: uncompressed, compressed and lossless compression. Depending on the bit depth selected, losslessly-compressed files are reduced in size by between 20% and 40%, while compressed files that are reduced in size by non-reversible algorithms are 40% to 55% smaller than uncompressed files.
      In addition to three JPEG quality settings covering three file sizes, two JPEG compression options are provided: size priority and optimal quality. The first compresses images to produce files that are relatively uniform in size, without regard for the effect of compression on image quality. The second prioritises picture quality but delivers files that may be of widely different sizes. Typical file sizes and buffer memory capacities for FX format (full frame) images are shown in the table below.

      Image quality

      Image size

      File size

      Buffer capacity

      NEF.RAW, lossless compressed, 12-bit

      -

      27.6MB

      24 shots

      NEF.RAW, lossless compressed, 14-bit

      -

      35.6MB

      28 shots

      NEF.RAW, compressed, 12-bit

      -

      23.0MB

      26 shots

      NEF.RAW, compressed, 14-bit

      -

      29.4MB

      34 shots

      NEF.RAW, uncompressed, 12-bit

      -

      38.9MB

      22 shots

      NEF.RAW, uncompressed, 14-bit

      -

      50.6MB

      21 shots

       

      TIFF (RGB)

      L

      73.5MB

      22 shots

      M

      41.5MB

      23 shots

      S

      18.6MB

      30 shots

       

      JPEG Fine

      L

      14.1MB

      44 shots

      M

      7.9MB

      78 shots

      S

      3.6MB

      80 shots

       

      JPEG Normal

      L

      7.1MB

      61 shots

      M

      4.0MB

      80 shots

      S

      1.8MB

      83 shots

       

      JPEG Basic

      L

      3.6MB

      69 shots

      M

      2.1MB

      82 shots

      S

      0.9MB

      83 shots

      DX format (24 x 16 mm area) images are roughly half the size of FX files. Typical DX file sizes and buffer capacities are shown in the table below.

      Image quality

      Image size

      File size

      Buffer capacity

      NEF.RAW, lossless compressed, 12-bit

      -

      12.1MB

      32 shots

      NEF.RAW, lossless compressed, 14-bit

      -

      15.5MB

      52 shots

      NEF.RAW, compressed, 12-bit

      -

      10.1MB

      38 shots

      NEF.RAW, compressed, 14-bit

      -

      12.9MB

      83 shots

      NEF.RAW, uncompressed, 12-bit

      -

      17.0MB

      29 shots

      NEF.RAW, uncompressed, 14-bit

      -

      22.1MB

      32 shots

       

      TIFF (RGB)

      L

      31.7MB

      24 shots

      M

      17.9MB

      29 shots

      S

      8.1MB

      40 shots

       

      JPEG Fine

      L

      6.1MB

      76 shots

      M

      3.4MB

      130 shots

      S

      1.6MB

      130 shots

       

      JPEG Normal

      L

      3.1MB

      130 shots

      M

      1.8MB

      130 shots

      S

      0.8MB

      130 shots

       

      JPEG Basic

      L

      1.6MB

      130 shots

      M

      0.9MB

      130 shots

      S

      0.4MB

      130 shots

      Note: The figures above are approximate and based on figures provided by Nikon. File sizes will vary with the amount of detail recorded in a subject. For JPEG files, the figures assume JPEG compression is set to Size Priority. Choosing the Optimal Quality setting increases file sizes and reduces the buffer capacity.

      Unchanged Features
      The menu systems in both cameras are virtually identical and almost all of the shooting parameters in the D3X are unchanged from the D3. (Nikon had no reason to fiddle with that camera's nicely-implemented system.)

      D3X_LCD

      The shooting menu displayed on the D3X's LCD monitor. (Source: Nikon.)
      The excellent Multi-CAM 3500FX AF sensor module and autofocusing system is also included in the new model, along with 1005-pixel RGB exposure metering system and P, A S and M controls. Shutter speeds are the same in both cameras and both boast the same Kevlar and carbon fibre composite shutter, which is rated for 300,000 cycles.

      D3_D3X_Shutter_unit

      The D3X's Kevlar/carbon fibre composite shutter, which is rated for 300,000 cycles. (Source: Nikon.)
      The white balance systems are the same in the two cameras. Exposure compensation and bracketing are also unchanged and both cameras include Nikon's Active D-Lighting. The Scene Recognition System that controls exposure by detecting the brightness and colours of the subjects is also provided as well as four kinds of Picture Controls: Standard, Neutral, Vivid, and Monochrome. Scene Recognition can be applied to control Autofocus, Auto Exposure, i-TTL Balanced Fill-flash and Auto White Balance.
      The 3-inch, 920,000-dot LCD monitor carries over from the D3, along with the accelerator sensor incorporated in the body of the camera that detects inclination and displays it on the LCD monitor as well as activating a tilt indicator in the viewfinder. The same two Live View modes are provided: Handheld and Tripod and optional Camera Control Pro 2 software enables monitor focus and control shutter release from a computer.
      In Live View shooting, a virtual horizon can be displayed on the LCD superimposed on the monitor image. And when the camera is connected to an HDMI video device via the appropriate cable (not supplied), the image 'seen' through the lens will be displayed on the video screen. This system lets photographers view enlarged live views of subjects - and also playback captured shots - on computer monitors or dedicated screens, such as HDTV sets.
      The viewfinders are the same in both cameras and the bright, 100% field-of-view provided in the D3's finder is replicated in the D3X, along with the same data display, focus indicators and virtual horizon display. Both cameras have user-replaceable interchangeable focusing screens and, like the D3, the D3X ships with a type B BriteView clear-matte VI focusing screen.
      The D3X can use lenses designed for both FX and DX formats and will automatically recognise a DX lens when it is fitted and, like the D3, will mask the image accordingly to show the actual field of view.

      D3X_CFcardslot

      Dual slots for CompactFlash cards provide added recording and backup flexibility. (Source: Nikon.)
      As in the D3, the D3X has dual CF card slots users can choose from Continuous recording, Backup recording and RAW + JPEG Separation recording (records the same image in RAW and JPEG on different cards). You can also copy the data from one card to another. It is also fully compatible with UDMA high-speed memory cards.
      The D3X can also interface with the optional GP-1 GPS unit to allow location data to be recorded in image files. Just like the D3, the D3X claims a start-up time of 0.12 second and a shutter release time lag of 0.04 second.
      In-camera editing functions accessed via the Retouch menu are the same as those provided by the D3. They include the ability to apply D-Lighting adjustments, red-eye correction, monochrome and filter effects and correct colour balance after shots have been recorded.

      D3X_colour-adjust-1

      Post-capture colour balance correction with the D3X's Retouch controls. The image above is as captured by the camera. The one below is after in-camera colour balance adjustment. Note: the black square on the colour plot shots the degree and direction of the colour adjustment while the histograms show which channel has been tweaked.

      D3X_colour-adjust-2

      Monochrome conversion (B&W, sepia and cyanotype) plus skylight and warm filter effects are also provided. Photographers can trim shots, call up side-by-side comparisons of retouched and original shots and combine two NEF.RAW files in the camera. Adjusted images are saved as separate files.
      The problematic issue of the lack of a sensor-shaking dust removal system remains in the new camera. In the course of our tests (which required lots of lens changes) we encountered dust spots on a number of shots (an example is shown in the Sample Images section at the end of this review). Interestingly, most of it didn't stick around for very long for some inexplicable reason.
      Nikon does provide the ability to record the position of dust spots in the camera via a Dust off ref photo setting in the Setup menu. You have to photograph a featureless white object (such as a wall or sheet of paper) with the lens focused on infinity. This image must be processed in Capture NX2 (which is sold separately, see below) and the same software must be used for subsequent removal of dust marks in shots.
      The mirror can be locked up to clean off persistent dust spots but the manual notes that the low-pass filter covering the sensor is 'extremely delicate and easily damaged' and recommends the filter be cleaned only by 'Nikon-authorised service personnel'.
      As befits a professional DSLR, the D3 is supplied with a dual battery charger, although only one EN-EL4a battery is supplied with the camera. It takes approximately two and a half hours to charge a depleted battery with the supplied MH-22 quick charger. Indicator lights on the charger show when the battery has reached 50%, 80% and 100% of charge.
      Power management is slightly better in the D3X than the D3. Whereas the D3 was rated for 4,300 shots per charge, in the D3X the battery is C.I.P.A. rated for approximately 4,400 shots with the AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED lens when the viewfinder is used for framing shots. Live view shooting and the use of VR lenses or the optional WT-4 wireless transmitter or GP-1 GPS unit will drain battery power, although Nikon does not state by how much.
      Connectivity options are equally extensive, with the standard Hi-Speed USB 2.0 and video-out terminals as well as an HDMI port, DC-IN connector (for the optional EH-6 AC adaptor), a PC flash-sync terminal and a 10-pin remote terminal for connecting the optional GP-1 GPS unit. Supplied accessories include the Rechargeable Li-ion Battery EN-EL4a, Quick Charger MH-22, USB Cable UC-E4, Audio Video Cable EG-D2, Camera Strap AN-D3X, Body Cap BF-1A, Accessory Shoe Cover BS-2, Eyepiece DK-17, Battery Chamber Cover BL-4, USB Cable Clip and Software Suite CD-ROM.

      Software
      Bundled software has long been a sore point for buyers of Nikon's high-end DSLRs. Whereas Canon supplies its top-end Digital Photo Professional (DPP) raw file converter/editor package - plus a Picture Style Editor - with all of its DSLR cameras, Nikon gives buyers of all its DSLRs the same, very basic Software Suite CD containing View NX, Nikon Transfer and Quicktime. (In our opinion, photographers who have forked out almost $14,000 for the camera body deserve better treatment than this.)
      You can download a trial version of Nikon's DPP-equivalent software, Capture NX2, from Nikon's website. But once the 30-day trial period expires, you must purchase the software, which costs more than $300. That said, the latest version, Capture NX2, is a capable raw file converter with an interface that is as straightforward to use as Canon's DPP. Some screen grabs are provided below.

      CaptureNX2-1

      The browser/editor window shpowing colour balance adjustments.

      CaptureNX2-3

      ICC profile support.

      CaptureNX2-4

      Batch processing.

      CaptureNX2-5

      Save options.
      Although we found NEF.RAW files from the D3X required few adjustments, the small amount of 'tweaking' we applied was easy to do with the degree of precision we required. The end results were very satisfying, regardless of whether they were JPEGs or TIFF images. Note: the latest version of Adobe Camera Raw (V.5.3) can decode raw files from the D3X but you need Photoshop CS4 to use it.

      Performance
      Given its smaller photosites, we weren't expecting the D3X to produce the image quality we obtained from the D3. However, we were mistaken: the new model, if anything, surpassed its predecessor in tonal subtlety and natural colour reproduction, particularly the 14-bit losslessly-compressed NEF.RAW files. These files, when converted to 16-bit TIFF format, had a quality that is, so far, unmatched by any camera we have reviewed thus far (although the D3 came pretty close).
      Skin tones were beautifully rendered in a variety of lighting conditions, giving us some of the best portrait shots we've ever captured, regardless of the file format we used (although raw files provided more scope for fine-tuning). Contrast was natural-looking and shadow noise was either negligible or so well-controlled as to be irrelevant at all ISO settings up to (and including) ISO 1600. Note: we have drawn these conclusions on the basis of the lenses supplied with the camera for us to review. All were of professional standard and top-rate performers.
      Focusing was spot-on for more than 95% of the shots we took, regardless of the drive mode selected. The AF system locked onto subjects instantly and accurately and we found no evidence of hunting, even in the low-light conditions we used for our long-exposure tests. Metering was also accurate with all supported modes, although the Matrix mode handled tricky subjects (backlighting and angled light) a little better than centre-weighted and spot metering.
      The viewfinder showed the full field of view and was accurate enough for us to frame shots for Photo Review's standard Imatest tests, which is more than we can say for most DSLR cameras. Live view shooting confirmed viewfinder accuracy.
      Imatest evaluation showed the test camera's performance to be in line with our expectations and at the level you would expect from a 24.5-megapixel camera. NEF.RAW files converted into 16-bit TIFF format with Capture NX2 yielded slightly higher resolution in our Imatest tests than JPEG files straight from the camera - but the difference wasn't huge. Test results with the three lenses we used on the review camera can be seen in the separate lens reviews for the AF-S 50mm f1.4G, AF-S 14-24mm f2.8G ED and AF-S 24-70mm f2.8G ED lenses.
      Image noise was barely visible in long exposures up to ISO 3200. Beyond that point, some luminance noise was evident. However, had no visible effect on image colours and overall apparent sharpness, although 200% enlargements of ISO 6400 shots revealed minor image softening. Resolution remained high in our Imatest tests throughout the review camera's ISO range. The results of tests with the AF-S 50mm f1.4G lens are shown in the graph below.

      D3X_Res-vs-ISO-graph

      Application of noise-reduction processing tended to increase overall softening, regardless of whether we selected high-sensitivity or long-exposure noise reduction. Colour accuracy was excellent with both raw and JPEG images and we found little evidence of over-saturation for almost all hues with the Neutral Picture Control setting. (Purples showed slightly elevated saturation but greens, yellows and reds are about as close to spot-on as you'd find.)
      With other Picture Controls, colours and saturation levels shifted in accordance with the setting's parameters. Lateral chromatic aberration was consistently negligible with all the lenses we reviewed.
      Not unexpectedly, the test camera's white balance performance was almost identical to the D3's. The auto setting failed to totally remove the inherent colour casts of either incandescent or fluorescent lighting, although it came quite close with the latter. Both manual pre-sets delivered neutral colours and it was easy to tune out colour casts with the in-camera controls before and after taking shots - as it was to correct colour casts with editing software.
      Furthermore, shots taken in 'real world' situations using the auto white balance setting showed an acceptable colour balance, even with incandescent and mixed lighting. Consequently, we feel this issue little practical relevance for normal photography.
      Like the D3, the D3X powered up almost instantly and Nikon's claimed release time lag of 0.04 second was credible in our capture lag tests - provided fast UDMA-compatible cards were used. With a non-UDMA SanDisk Extreme III 8GB card we measured an average capture lag of 0.2 seconds, which was eliminated by pre-focusing. Shot-to-shot times averaged 0.3 seconds when this card was used but were too brief to measure when an UDMA card was used.
      With the Continuous Low shooting mode, Large/Fine JPEGs were captured at 0.3 second intervals, while the Continuous High mode recorded at five frames/second, as per specifications. It took 16.1 seconds to process a burst of 10 Large/Fine JPEGs recorded on a SanDisk Extreme III 8GB card but only 5.6 seconds to process a 10-shot burst taken on a 4GB SanDisk Extreme IV CF card, which is UDMA enabled.
      For NEF.RAW files, a 10-shot burst recorded on the 4GB SanDisk Extreme IV CF card was processed in 12.8 seconds. Five TIFF files, recorded on the 8GB SanDisk Extreme III card took 29 seconds to process and store.

      Conclusion
      We don't normally direct readers to other websites but, because the NikonD3X is such an expensive camera, we feel readers need to seek more than one expert opinion before parting with their cash. Photo Review's tests were on the single camera body that was supplied to us for review. This is normal practice and most review sites will also test only one camera body. This may - or may not - provide the confirmation you require that your money is well-spent.
      For a real-world account of one purchaser's experiences we recommend potential buyers check out Thom Hogan's encounters with several D3Xs he tested in his homeland, the USA. Go to http://bythom.com/nikond3xreview.htm. While we don't claim local buyers are likely to experience similar disappointments to those he found with the first D3X he acquired, we believe he raises some very valid points about the purchasing experiences that should be a normal part of buying premium-priced products like this camera.

      Buy this camera if:
      - You want the best imaging performance from a DSLR camera you can purchase right now. - You want medium format file sizes and imaging performance.
      - You want with the ability to choose from a much wider range of lenses than you'd get with a medium format camera.
      - You have a clientele that will pay premium prices for images shot with the DX3.
      - You want total integration with studio flash systems and on-camera flash units.
      - You require high reliability and extensive weatherproof sealing for outdoor photography in all weather conditions and all types of environments.
      - You have an existing suite of high-end Nikkor lenses and want a camera body to deliver the best from them.
      Don't buy this camera if:
      - You're not going to use its full capabilities.
      - You work in dusty environments and change lenses frequently.
      - You're not prepared to invest in fast, high-capacity memory cards plus plenty of archiving storage.
      - You need a built-in flash.

      IMATEST GRAPHS

      JPEG image files

      D3X_DSC3337_YBL74_ca
      D3X_DSC3337_YAR29_cpp
      D3X_DSC3337_YBL74_cpp

      Raw image files converted into 16-bit TIFF format with Capture NX2.

      D3X_RAW_DSC3337_colorerror
      D3X_RAW_DSC3337_colors
      D3X_RAW_DSC3337_YBL74_ca
      D3X-RAW_DSC3337_YAR29_cpp
      D3X_RAW_DSC3337_YBL74_cpp

      SAMPLE IMAGES

      D3X_DSC3584

      Tungsten lighting, real-world situation: auto white balance, ISO 100, 1/10 second at f/9.5; 24-70mm lens set at 24mm.

      D3X_DSC3557

      Mixed lighting, real-world situation: auto white balance, ISO 1600, 1/180 second at f/6.7; 24-70mm lens set at 30mm.

      D3X-ISO100-night

      30-second exposure at f/2; ISO 100. (50mm f/1.4 lens)

      D3X-ISO6400-night-noNR

      30-second exposure at f/11; ISO 6400 no noise reduction. (50mm f/1.4 lens)

      D3X-ISO6400-night-longEXnr-on

      30-second exposure at f/11; ISO 6400 plus long exposure noise reduction processing.

      D3X-ISO6400-night-hiISOnr-high

      30-second exposure at f/11; ISO 6400 plus high sensitivity noise reduction processing.

      D3X_DSC3682

      50mm lens, ISO 1600, 1/60 second at f/4.

      D3X_DSC3565

      70mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/30 second at f/8

      D3X_DSC3635-D-Lighting

      Active D-Lighting on Normal: 58mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/60 second at f/95.

      D3X_DSC3554

      Active D-Lighting on Extra High: 32mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/200 second at f/11.

      D3X_DSC3612-tracking-AF

      Focus tracking with lock-on; 21-point dynamic AF area; 70mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/90 second at f/8.

      Nikkor14-24__DSC3636

      Backlighting: 14mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/90 second at f/13.

      Nikkor14-24_DSC3643

      14-24mm lens, 24mm focal length, ISO 800, 1/15 second at f/16.

      Nikkor24-70_DSC3569-slow

      70mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/10 second at f/13.

      D3X-DUST_DSC3591

      Dust on sensor; the red circles indicate the position of dust spots.

      More sample images can be viewed in the reviews of the AF-S 50mm f1.4G, AF-S 14-24mm f2.8G ED and AF-S 24-70mm f2.8G ED lenses.

       

       

      Specifications

      leadpic_Nikon_D3X_50

      Image sensor: Nikon FX format 35.9 x 24.0 mm CMOS sensor, total pixels: 25.72 million; 24.5 megapixels effective
      Lens mount: Nikon F mount with AF coupling and AF contacts
      Focal length crop factor: 1x
      Image formats: NEF (RAW) 12-bit or 14-bit, uncompressed, losslessly compressed or compressed; TIFF (RGB); JPEG; RAW+JPEG
      Image Sizes: FX format 6,048 x 4,032 [L], 4,544 x 3,024 [M], 3,024 x 2,016 [S]; DX format (24 x 16): 3,968 x 2,640 [L], 2,976 x 1,976 [M], 1,984 x 1,320 [S] 5:4 (30 x 24): 5,056 x 4,032 [L], 3,792 x 3,024 [M], 2,528 x 2,016 [S]
      Image Stabilisation: Lens-based only
      Dust removal: only Image Dust Off data acquisition (Capture NX required)
      Shutter speed range: 1/8000 to 30 sec in steps of 1/3, 1/2 or 1 EV plus Bulb; X-synch at 1/250 sec.
      Exposure Compensation: +/- 5 EV in f 1/3, 1/2 or 1 EV steps
      Exposure bracketing: 2–9 frames in steps of 1/3, 1/2, 2/3 or 1 EV
      Self-timer: 2, 5, 10 or 20 sec. delay selectable
      Focus system: TTL phase detection with Nikon MultiCAM 3500DX module; 51 AF points (including 15 cross-type sensors) with single point selection from 51 or 11 points
      Focus modes: Single-servo AF, continuous-servo AF, manual focusing; predictive focus tracking automatically activated according to subject status
      Exposure metering: TTL full-aperture metering with 1005-pixel RGB sensor; 3D Colour matrix Metering II, Centre-weighted (75% bias to 8-20 mm circle at centre), Spot metering (4mm circle)
      Shooting modes: Program AE with flexible program, Shutter-priority auto, Aperture-priority auto, Manual
      Picture Style/Control settings: Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome; storage for up to nine custom Picture Controls
      Colour space options: sRGB, Adobe RGB
      Custom functions: 48
      ISO range: ISO 100 to 1600 in steps of 1/3, 1/2, or 1 EV; can be set to approx. 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, or 1 EV (ISO 50 equivalent) below ISO 100, or to approx. 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1, or 2 EV (ISO 6400 equivalent) over ISO 1600
      White balance: Auto plus seven manual modes with fine-tuning, colour temperature setting; bracketing of 2-9 frames in increments of 1, 2 or 3
      Flash: ISO 518 accessory shoe for Nikon Speedlights; support for iTTL and Nikon Creative Lighting System
      Flash bracketing: 2–9 frames in steps of 1/3, 1/2, 2/3 or 1 EV
      Sequence shooting: DX format: 5-7 fps high speed, up to 5 fps low speed; other formats: up to 5 fps
      Storage Media: Double slot for Type I/II CompactFlash cards/microdrives
      Viewfinder: Eye-level pentaprism; 100% coverage; approx. 0.7x magnification; 18mm eyepoint; dioptric adjustment -3.0 to +1 dpt
      LCD monitor: 3.0-inch TFT colour LCD, 920,000 pixels
      Live View modes: 1) Handheld: TTL phase difference AF with 51 focus points 2) Tripod: focal-plane contrast AF on selected point
      Video Capture: No
      Data LCD: Yes; displays full photographic and digital settings
      Playback functions: Full frame, thumbnail (4 or 9 segment), zoom, slideshow, RGB histogram, shooting data, highlight point display, auto image rotation, image comment (up to 36 characters), voice memo (input and playback)
      Interface terminals: USB Hi-speed, HDMI, Video Out (PAL/NTSC), GPS, 10-pin remote
      Power supply: EN-EL4a rechargeable lithium-ion battery; Quick Charger MH-22/MH-21, AC Adapter EH-6 (optional)
      Dimensions (wxhxd): 159.5 x 157 x 87.5 mm (body only)
      Weight: Approx. 1,220 grams (without battery, memory card, body cap, lens or accessory shoe cover)

       

      Retailers

       

      CamBuy

       

      www.cambuy.com.au
      Digital cameras, lenses and accessories with 100% genuine Australian manufacturer's warranties.
      Ph: (02) 9029 2219

      Camera House

       

      CH_Logo120

      www.camerahouse.com.au
      Ph: 133 686
      The largest speciality photographic retail chain in Australia.

      Camera Pro

       

      www.camerapro.net.au
      CameraPro Pty Ltd
      Suite 607, 180 Queen St, Brisbane 4000
      Tel: 07 3333 2900
      Australian owned and run company based in Brisbane.

      Camerasdirect

       

      CamerasDirect133

      www.camerasdirect.com.au
      Retailer of digital camera equipment and more.
      Secure online shopping and delivery across Australia.
      Ph: 1300 727 056

      Camerastore.com.au

      Camerastore.com.au
      Ph: 1800 155 067

      Camera-Warehouse

       

      camera-warehouse120

      www.camera-warehouse.com.au
      Comprehensive range of digital cameras and accessories online (www.camera-warehouse.com.au) and an online print service (www.royalexpress.com.au).

      Digital Camera Warehouse

       

      www.digitalcamerawarehouse.com.au
      174 Canterbury Road 367 High Street
      Canterbury Northcote
      NSW 2193 VIC 3070
      Ph: 1300 365 220

      Electronics Warehouse

       

      www.electronicswarehouse.com.au
      1300 801 885
      Australian retailer of Vapex rechargeable batteries offering factory direct prices and fast, free shipping Australia wide.

      Greg Smith's Photo Accessories

       

      www.dvdreamtime.com.au
      1800 50 80 82
      Big range of photographic accessories, Australia-wide shipping.

      Paxtons

       

      www.paxtons.com.au
      285 George St
      Sydney NSW 2000
      Ph: (02) 9299 2999

      Photographic Equipment & Supplies - Retail & Repairs. Click here for list of stores.

      Ted's Cameras

       

      Teds-Logo120

      www.teds.com.au

      1800 186 895
      Big range of cameras and photographic products with stores in most states and online.

      Rating

       

      PR-EdChoice-web-100

      RRP: $13,999 (body only)

      Rating (out of 10):

      • Build: 9.5
      • Ease of use: 9.0
      • Image quality: 9.5
      • OVERALL: 9.0

       

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