Pentax K-50


    Photo Review 8.8
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    Pentax K-50

      In summary

       Like its predecessor, the K-50 will suit a wide range of photo enthusiasts with different levels of expertise. It is particularly appealing to cost-conscious buyers, for whom it represents excellent value for money.

      Pentax DSLRs benefit from built-in sensor-shift stabilisation, which means you don't require stabilised lenses. Accordingly, Pentax lenses and lighter, more compact and cheaper than equivalent lenses from companies like Canon and Nikon, which opt for lens-based stabilisation.

      Although the range of Pentax-branded lenses is smaller than the offerings from Canon and Nikon, it covers the main photographic genres very well and includes fast primes, short and long zooms, super-telephotos and macro lenses, along with some innovative 'pancake' designs. Most third-party lens manufacturers also cater for the K-mount.

      The K-50 also represents a good choice for bushwalkers and wildlife photographers or, indeed, anyone who takes pictures in environments where dust and moisture are present. Weather-resistant sealing is rare in cameras at the K-50's price point, giving it a significant advantage for these photographers.

      Novice photographers could also consider the K-50 as a camera they can learn with, even though the array of controls may be initially bewildering. The supplied instruction manual is well laid out and easy to understand and will reward those who are prepared to work their way through it.

      More experienced photographers will also benefit from the use of the 'open' DNG.RAW file format for raw file capture. This format is supported by all raw file converters so, if you're reluctant to move to Adobe's Cloud-based applications, you can stick with your current software and still open DNG.RAW files with this camera – and future models to come.

      Travellers may find the ability to use AA batteries handy in situations where access to mains power makes it difficult to keep lithium-ion batteries charged. Finally, Wi-Fi support is available for the generation of photographers who need to be 'connected'.

       

      Full review

      The Pentax K-50 was announced in June 2013 as a replacement for the popular K-30, which we reviewed in August 2012. It has a similar, weather-sealed, dust-resistant body but improved versions of the 16.3-megapixel APS-C sensor and PRIME M processor, which have been tweaked to reduce noise and minimise aliasing ('jaggies'). New features include an extension of sensitivity to ISO 512,000 and support for Eye-Fi SD cards to enable users to share images and movie clips wirelessly.

       Angled front view of the Pentax K-50 with the flash raised and the new DA-L 18-55mm WR lens. (Source: Pentax.)

      Released with the new camera are two new lenses – the DA-L 18-55mm WR and DA-L 50-200mm WR – which are also weather-sealed. We received the DA-L 18-55mm WR to review with the K-50 body.

      Who's it For?
       Like its predecessor, the K-50 will suit a wide range of photo enthusiasts with different levels of expertise. It is particularly appealing to cost-conscious buyers, for whom it represents excellent value for money.

      Pentax DSLRs benefit from built-in sensor-shift stabilisation, which means you don't require stabilised lenses. Accordingly, Pentax lenses and lighter, more compact and cheaper than equivalent lenses from companies like Canon and Nikon, which opt for lens-based stabilisation.

      Although the range of Pentax-branded lenses is smaller than the offerings from Canon and Nikon, it covers the main photographic genres very well and includes fast primes, short and long zooms, super-telephotos and macro lenses, along with some innovative 'pancake' designs. Most third-party lens manufacturers also cater for the K-mount.

      The K-50 also represents a good choice for bushwalkers and wildlife photographers or, indeed, anyone who takes pictures in environments where dust and moisture are present. Weather-resistant sealing is rare in cameras at the K-50's price point, giving it a significant advantage for these photographers.

      Novice photographers could also consider the K-50 as a camera they can learn with, even though the array of controls may be initially bewildering. The supplied instruction manual is well laid out and easy to understand and will reward those who are prepared to work their way through it.

      More experienced photographers will also benefit from the use of the 'open' DNG.RAW file format for raw file capture. This format is supported by all raw file converters so, if you're reluctant to move to Adobe's Cloud-based applications, you can stick with your current software and still open DNG.RAW files with this camera – and future models to come.

      Travellers may find the ability to use AA batteries handy in situations where access to mains power makes it difficult to keep lithium-ion batteries charged. Finally, Wi-Fi support is available for the generation of photographers who need to be 'connected'.

      What's New?
       The most obvious difference between the K-50 and its predecessor is the increase in the number of colour combinations the camera offers. Whereas the K-30 was offered in up to three colours (only black and white in Australia with the addition of blue in North America), the K-50's body is manufactured in 120 different colour combinations (shown below). 

      The multiple colour options available for the K-50 body. (Source: Pentax.)

      Only three colours (black, white and red) are widely available in stores. However, Pentax offers a Colour to Order system that enables users to match, say, a pink body with a blue grip, although such customised cameras will take a few weeks to ship.

      The basic Sony-produced 16.3-megapixel APS-C sensor chip has a tried-and-proven record for excellent high ISO performance in cameras like the Nikon D7000, Sony A580 and Sony NEX-5N – as well as the Pentax K-5 and K-30. However, it and PRIME M processor from the last generation of K-series DSLRs have gained some enhancements that distinguish the K-50 from its predecessor.

      Although image sizes haven't changed, the new processor has enabled the top sensitivity in the K-50 to be increased to ISO 51200, a full stop higher than the K-30. Improvements to image processing promise reduced aliasing, which means fewer visible 'jaggies' in images. Interestingly, continuous shooting speeds remain at a maximum of six frames per second, with a buffer limit of roughly 30 high-resolution JPEGs or eight DNG.RAW files.

      The K-50 gains Wi-Fi capabilities through support for Eye-Fi SD cards, which enable  users to upload images up to a maximum of 2GB in size to smart-phones, tablets and computers on a wireless LAN. According to the user manual, only still images can be transferred and both JPEG and DNG.RAW formats are supported. Movies and Interval Movies cannot be selected for transfer.

      Unchanged Features
       Aside from the multiple colour options, the design of the body of the K-50 is almost identical to its predecessor's, with a stainless steel chassis and polycarbonate (plastic) cladding that has a slightly smoother texture than the K-30's.  According to Pentax,  81 weatherproof seals make this camera splash-resistant, dustproof and cold-resistant to -10 degrees Celsius.

      Key features carried over from the K-30 include the pentaprism viewfinder with 100% field of view coverage and interchangeable focusing screen (four options are available). The 921,000-dot 3-inch TFT colour LCD monitor is also unchanged and, as in the K-30, it's fixed in place as part of the weatherproofing.

       Front view of the K-50 with no lens, showing the stainless steel lens mount and APS-C sized image sensor. (Source: Pentax.)

      The grip is deep enough to please photographers with large hands and/or long fingers and comfortable to use in both landscape and portrait orientation as well as with gloved hands.  The control layout is identical to the K-30's and the lens mount is fully compatible with KAF3, KAF2, KAF and KA lenses.
       
       

      Top and back views of the K-50 body. (Source: Pentax.)

      As in the K-30, Pentax's SR (Shake Reduction) technology is based on moving the sensor to compensate for camera movements and includes dust removal. The SR system can correct camera shake and rotational shift to provide up to four EV of compensation, with an average correction equivalent to three f-stops.

      The SAFOX IXi+ AF sensor module also carries over from the K-30. The system uses 11 sensors, including nine cross-type sensors in the centre. A select-area expansion function assists tracking AF by assessing the distance data collected by neighbouring focus sensors. A spot-beam projector is available to improve focusing speed and accuracy in poorly lit locations.

      The battery and SD  card compartments are the same as in the K-30. A terminal below the memory card slot on the right hand side panel enables users to connect an optional cable release.

      Like the K-30, the K-50 offers users the choice of using a rechargeable D-LI109  lithium-ion battery (supplied with charger) of four AA batteries. The D-LI109's capacity is rated at a relatively low 410 shots/charge, while you can expect roughly 710 shots from a set of four lithium AA batteries.

      Camera controls are essentially unchanged. The mode dial carries the same settings as the K-30 and the Auto Picture mode automatically detects and selects the most appropriate shooting mode for a given subject or scene. The K-50 also offers the same 19 Scene modes: Portrait, Landscape, Macro, Moving Object, Night Scene Portrait, Sunset, Blue Sky, Forest, Night Scene, Night Scene HDR (JPG), Night Snap, Food, Pet, Kids, Surf & Snow, Backlight Silhouette, Candlelight, Stage Lighting and Museum.

      The 11 custom image modes are also unchanged, as are the 19 different filter effects and users can still apply multiple filters to a single image. Manual focusing aids include magnification of up to six times and focus peaking in Live View mode. But as in the K-30, focus peaking isn't usable while you're shooting video clips.

      The standard P, A, S  and M settings on the mode dial are augmented by the usual Pentax specialties SV (sensitivity priority) and TAV (shutter and aperture priority) plus a Bulb mode for long exposures. In-camera HDR (high dynamic range) recording is also supported for JPEG capture, with options for +/- one, two or three EV jumps in exposure levels and selectable auto alignment.
       

      The images above show the effect of the HDR mode with 1EV steps in exposure levels. The top image has no processing, while the lower image has HDR processing applied. More examples of HDR photography can be found in the Samples section below.

      Movie recording is also unchanged, with 1080p Full HD available  at 30/25/24 frames per second, and 720p HD at 60/50/30/25/24 fps captured in the MOV MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) format. The maximum clip length is 25 minutes.

      Like the K-30, the K-50 has no wind filter, although flicker-reduction is available. The built-in microphone is monaural but there's no input jack for external mics. However, recording levels are adjustable via the INFO menu or the Movie page in the main menu.

      Interval recording for time-lapse sequences is supported, with intervals of three, five, ten or 30 seconds as well as one, five, ten and 30 minutes and one hour. Total recording time can cover between four seconds and 99 hours and users can set the start time. Sequences are recorded as Motion JPEG (AVI) movies.

      The K-50 supports a high level of customisation, enabling users to record two sets of settings combinations in the User memories accessed via the mode dial. In addition, there are 22 custom functions plus a mode memory containing 12 items and the RAW/Fx and AF/AE-L  buttons can have different functions assigned to them.

      AF Fine Adjustment tweaking allows +/- 10 adjustment steps to be applied to lenses. An adjustment can be applied to all lenses or individual lenses and, for the latter, up to 20 adjustments can be saved. Copyright information can also be embedded in image data.

      The K-50 retains compatibility with the optional O-GPS1 GPS recorder, which includes an electronic compass and automatic synchronisation of the camera's date and time settings with the location, using GPS data. The ASTROTRACER function for tracking and photographing stars and other celestial phenomena. It matches the movement of the camera's built-in shake reduction unit with the movement of astronomical subject(s) to ensure minimal blurring, even during long exposures.

      Playback and Software
       Nothing has changed since the K-30. As with the K-30, no software was provided with the review camera. This wasn't a problem as raw files from the K-50 can be opened in most popular file conversion applications, including Adobe Camera Raw. And you don't need the latest Adobe software to support the DNG files.

      The Kit Lens
      The review camera was supplied with the new smc Pentax-DAL 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 AL WR kit lens. Like the previous kit lens we reviewed in January 2009 (INSERT LINK), this lens carries an 'Assembled in Vietnam' label and has a plastic mounting plate. Build quality is generally good for a kit lens.

      The WR lens is marginally larger than its predecessor but covers the same angles of view (76 to 29 degrees), providing the equivalent to 27.5-84.5mm in 35mm format. Measuring 68.5 mm in length, with a diameter of 67.5 mm, it weighs 230 grams without its end caps.

      The optical design contains 11 elements in eight groups with one aspherical element and one super-low dispersion element. The minimum focus is 25 cm and the lens has six diaphragm blades and accepts 52mm filters. The front element has a coating of a fluorine compound that repels dust and moisture and makes it easy to remove fingerprints.

      The zoom and focusing rings each have a textured rubber coating that provides a secure grip. The focusing ring is just under 10 mm wide and located about 8 mm back from the front of the outer barrel. It rotates through roughly 90 degrees.

      Autofocusing is driven by a rather old-fashioned slotted drive screw, which is controlled by the camera body and produces noticeable focusing noise. The focus ring rotates during autofocusing, although the front element  doesn't rotate during either focusing or zooming, enabling use of angle-critical attachments.

      The zoom ring is approximately 30 mm wide and carries a 20 mm wide grip band. Stamped on its trailing edge are markings for the 18mm, 24mm,  35mm, 45mm and 55mm positions. There's no distance indicator and the AF/MF switch is on the camera body, rather than the lens. Pentax's Quick-Shift Focus System, which allows manual fine-tuning of focus settings, is supported.

      The review lens showed similar distortion and vignetting characteristics to the DA 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6AL II lens we reviewed previously. Its handling characteristics were also similar and it was a comfortable match for the K-50 body.

       Its overall performance was also very good and, if anything, a little better than the previous lens. Like that lens, it delivered the highest resolution in our Imatest tests at wider apertures, tailing off from about f/6.3 onwards where diffraction began to impact on image sharpness.

      As with the previous lens, the 35mm focal length setting gave the highest resolution, peaking at f/5.6. The graph below shows the results of our Imatest tests.

       
       With the in-camera corrections switched off, Imatest showed lateral chromatic aberration was very well controlled and most measurements fell in the 'negligible' category. In the graph of our Imatest results, below, the red line marks the boundary between the 'negligible' and 'low' bands.

       
       Note: Like the K-30, the K-50 can apply CA-reduction processing automatically when JPEG files are recorded. In-camera distortion correction is also available. These corrections only work with DA, DA L, D FA and some FA lenses
       
      Performance
       Like other Pentax DSLRs, the review camera's default Custom Image setting was Bright, which tends to boost colour saturation and contrast in JPEG files. (Raw files are not affected.) Knowing how this affects the colour accuracy, we re-set the camera to the Natural position and left it on that setting for the remainder of our tests.

      Although the K-50's sensor may appear a bit dated, it remains capable of delivering excellent image quality, as we found with our Imatest tests, which showed the review camera to be capable of meeting – and at times exceeding – expectations for the sensor's resolution with both JPEG and DNG.RAW files. The differences between the resolutions measured for these file types weren't as great as we usually find, except at higher sensitivities. The graph below shows the results of our tests across the camera's ISO range.

       
       Subjective assessments of images, showed the K-50 can produce very clean files with little visible noise at sensitivities up to ISO 1600. By ISO 3200, noise could be seen and it became more noticeable as sensitivity was increased.  Most detail was preserved and colours remained accurate at ISO 6400 and 12800, particularly in flash shots. 

      However, beyond that point a significant loss of detail occurs and image quality is so poor at ISO 51200 with ambient light exposures we feel this setting should only be used when absolutely necessary.  Flash exposures were less noise-affected but a little soft. It could be better to record DNG.RAW files at ISO 6400 at a stop or two underexposed if long exposures were required in low light levels.

      With distortion correction disabled, the kit lens displayed noticeable barrel distortion at the 18mm focal length. This was mostly corrected by 24mm and the remaining focal length settings were virtually distortion-free.

      Slight vignetting could be seen with the widest apertures at all focal lengths, with the 18mm setting having the most noticeable edge and corner darkening. Bokeh was smooth and attractive for a kit lens with the 55mm setting, particularly in the Macro mode.

      Subjective assessments of the autofocusing system suggested it supported similar speeds to the K-30's with similar focusing accuracy and no obvious tendency to hunt. This assessment was confirmed by our timing tests (see below). Autofocusing in Live View mode was noticeably slower than when shooting with the viewfinder.

      Auto white balance performance was similar to the K-30's, with shots taken under fluorescent lighting showing no evidence of colour casts and shots taken in incandescent lighting retaining a slight orange cast. Both pre-sets came close to neutral colour rendition and there's plenty of scope for in-camera tweaking of colour balance.

      The sharpness and colour reproduction in movie clips from the review camera was slightly better than the clips we shot with the K-30, although autofocusing speeds were similar. The AF motor is noisy enough to be recorded in the background if focusing changes during recording. Otherwise soundtrack quality was acceptable – but not outstanding.

      Our timing tests were carried out with the same 16GB Panasonic SDHC U1 Class 10 card as we used for our review of the K-30.  The review camera was marginally faster to power-up ready for shooting, taking just on one second.

      We measured a consistent capture lag of 0.2 seconds, which was eliminated by pre-focusing. Shot-to shot times averaged 0.4 seconds without flash and 1.8 seconds with. It took one second on average to process each JPEG file, 1.8 seconds for a DNG.RAW and 2.6 seconds for a RAW+JPEG pair.

      When the high-speed setting was selected in the continuous shooting mode, the review camera recorded 10 Large/Super-Fine JPEGs in two seconds. It took 2.9 seconds to process this burst.

      Nine DNG.RAW frames were recorded in 1.8 seconds before capture rates began to slow. It took 6.4 seconds to process this burst. Swapping to RAW+JPEG reduced the burst depth to seven frame pairs, which were recorded in 1.3 seconds and took 8.1 seconds to process.

      Conclusion
       Performance-wise, the K-50 merits an Editor's Choice rating because it delivers clean files with high resolution at an affordable price. The weatherproof body of the camera and kit lens represent excellent value for the relatively modest $899 price tag.

      Although its price is the same as the K-30's was on release, the passage of time has seen the value of the AU$ decline against the US$ (although it was rallying again when this review was posted). The US MSRP (manufacturer's suggested retail price) for the K-50 single-lens kit is almost AU$100 less than the Australian price, which isn't as great a difference as we see for some products but still could make some potential buyers pause.

      However, The K-50 single lens kit  remains good value for Australian buyers – and there's really no incentive to order a camera and lens off-shore. The associated delay in receiving the camera and uncertainties about its condition on arrival. Not to mention the cost of shipping, still make it better to buy in Australia.

      The local distributor, C.R. Kennedy & Company, has done a Sterling job of keeping the prices of the equipment it imports internationally competitive for several years and this has become increasingly challenging in recent times. The company's after-sale support system is also exemplary, so there's really nothing to be gained by shopping off-shore (you won't even get custom colour cameras quicker).

       

      SPECS

       Image sensor: 23.7 x 15.7 mm CMOS sensor with 16.49 million photosites (16.28 megapixels effective); primary colour filter
       Image processor: PRIME M
       A/D processing: 12-bit
       Lens mount: PENTAX KAF2 bayonet mount
       Focal length crop factor: 1.5x
       Image formats: Stills – DNG.RAW, JPEG (Exif 2.3), RAW+JPEG; Movies – MPEG–4 AVC/H.264
       Image Sizes: Stills – 16M(4928x3264), 12M(4224x2816), 8M(3456x2304), 5M(2688x1792); Movies: 1920x1080 (Full HD) at 30p/25p/24p, 1280x720 (HD) at 60p/50p, 640x480 (SD) : 30p/25p; VGA at 30/25/24 fps (3 quality levels)
       Image Stabilisation: Sensor shift Shake Reduction
       Dust removal: SP coating and CMOS sensor vibration
       Shutter speed range: 1/6000 to 30 seconds plus bulb, X-sync at 1/180 sec.
       Exposure Compensation: +/- 5EV in 1/3- or 1/2-EV increments
       Exposure bracketing: +/-3 EV in 1/3- or 1/2-EV increments (can be combined with manual exposure compensation)
       Self-timer:  2 or 10 seconds delay
       Focus system: SAFOX IXi+, TTL: phase-matching autofocus system with 11 sensor points (9 cross type focus points in the centre);  dedicated LED AF assist light
       Focus modes: Auto AF (AF.A), Single AF (AF.S), Continuous AF (AF.C); Focus priority or shutter priority mode for AF.S; Focus priority or FPS priority mode for AF.C
       AF point selection Auto: 5 points, Auto: 11 points, Select (Expanded Area AF available), Spot
       Exposure metering: TTL open aperture, 77 segmented metering, centre-weighted and spot metering 
      Shooting modes: Program, Sensitivity Priority, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Shutter & Aperture Priority, Manual, Bulb; Auto Picture mode (JPEG only): auto. selects from Standard, Portrait, Landscape, Macro, Moving Object, Night Scene Portrait, Night Scene,Blue Sky, Forest Scene; Scene Modes: Portrait, Landscape, Macro, Moving Object, Night Scene Portrait, Sunset, Blue Sky, Forest, Night Scene, Night Scene HDR, Night Snap, Food, Pet, Kids, Surf & Snow, Backlight Silhouette, Candlelight, Stage Lighting, Museum
      Custom Image settings: Bright, Natural, Portrait, Landscape, Vibrant, Radiant, Muted, Bleach Bypass, Reversal Film, Monochrome, Cross Processing
      Colour space options: sRGB, Adobe RGB
      Custom functions: 22
      ISO range: Auto, ISO 100 - 51200 in 1EV steps
      White balance: Preset (daylight, Shade, Cloudy, Fluorescent Light (D: Daylight Colour, N:Daylight White, W: Cool White, L: Warm White), Tungsten, Flash, CTE, Manual, Colour), Fine adjustment (+/-7 steps on A-B axis or G-M axis), auto (combination CMOS image sensor and light source detection sensor), manual (configuration using the display screen, up to 3 settings can be saved), Colour Temperature settings, Copying the white balance setting of a captured image 
      Flash: Built-in retractable P-TTL auto pop-up flash; Guide number: approx. 12 (ISO 100/m); coverage: wide angle-lens, equivalent to 28mm in 35mm format
      Flash exposure adjustment: -2 to +1 EV 
      Sequence shooting: Max. approx. 6 shots/sec. for up to  full-resolution JPEGs or CR2.RAW files with a UHS-I certified SDHC or SDXC card
      Other features: HDR capture: Auto, HDR 1, HDR 2, HDR 3, Auto. composition correction; Exposure Bracket Value: +/-1EV, +/-2EV, +/-3EV; Multi-exposure (2 to 9 shots, exposure adjusted automatically); Interval shooting. Horizon correction
      Storage Media: Single slot for SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards; UHS-1 compatible
      Viewfinder: Pentaprism with approx. 100% FOV coverage, 0,92x magnification, approx. 21.7 mm eye relief (from the view window), -2.5  to + 1.5 dioptre adjustment,  interchangeable Natural-Bright-Matte III focusing screen, electronic level
      LCD monitor: 3-inch TFT colour LCD with approx. 921,000 dots; wide angle viewing
      Live View shooting: Focusing mechanism: Contrast detection + Face detection, tracking, select, spot. Field of View: approx. 100%, Magnified view (2x, 4x, 6x), Grid display (4x4 Grid, Golden Section, Scale display), Bright/dark area warning,  Histogram
      Playback functions: Single frame, Multi-image display (4/9/16/36/81 segments), Display magnification (up to 16x, scrolling & quick magnification), rotating, histogram, bright/dark area warning, copyright display, calendar film strip, folder display, display, slideshow, Eye-Fi transfer  
      Interface terminals: A/V out/digital terminal USO 2.0
      Power supply: Dual power chamber accepts D-LI109 rechargeable lithium-ion battery (supplied) or 4 AA batteries; CIPA rated for approx.410 shots/charge for D-LI109 or 710 shots with AA batteries
      Dimensions (wxhxd): 129.0 x 96.5 x 70.0 mm (body only)
      Weight: Approx. 590 grams (body only)

       

      TESTS

      JPEG image files

       

      Raw image files converted into 16-bit TIFF format with Adobe Camera Raw.

       

       

      SAMPLES

       

       Auto white balance with incandescent lighting.

       Auto white balance with fluorescent lighting.
       
       

      Rectilinear distortion at 18mm.
       
       

      Rectilinear distortion at 35mm.
       
       

      Rectilinear distortion at 55mm.
       
       

      Vignetting at 18mm.
       
       

      Vignetting at 35mm.
       
       

      Vignetting at 55mm.

       30-second exposure at ISO 100; 24mm focal length at f/4.

      8-second exposure at ISO 1600;24mm focal length at f/6.3.

       

      6-second exposure at ISO 6400;24mm focal length at f/11.
       
       

      6-second exposure at ISO 12800;24mm focal length at f/16.
       
       

      4-second exposure at ISO 25600;24mm focal length at f/18.
       
       

      4-second exposure at ISO 51200;24mm focal length at f/22.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 100; 55mm focal length, 1/40 second at f/5.6.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 1600; 55mm focal length, 1/40 second at f/5.6.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 6400; 55mm focal length, 1/40 second at f/5.6.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 12800; 55mm focal length, 1/40 second at f/6.3.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 25600; 55mm focal length, 1/40 second at f/9.
       
       

      Flash exposure at ISO 51200; 55mm focal length, 1/40 second at f/13.
       
       

      18mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/60 second at f/11.
       
       

      55mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/50 second at f/11.
       

      Close-up in Av mode; 55mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/125 second at f/5.6.
       
       

      Close-up using the Macro setting in the Scene pre-sets; 55mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/100 second at f/7.1.

      Dynamic range: 23mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/160 second at f/8.

      28mm focal length, ISO 800, 1/60 second at f/8.

       

      55mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/1250 second at f/7.1.

      55mm focal length, ISO 1600, 1/100 second at f/6.3.

       

      55mm focal length, ISO 3200, 1/100 second at f/11.
       
       

      55mm focal length, ISO 800, 1/100 second at f/11.
       
       

      55mm focal length, ISO 200, 1/500 second at f/7.1.

      HDR mode with 2EV increments. Note the ghost images on moving subjects in the scene. 21mm focal length, ISO 100, 1/640 second at f/5.

       

      Comparison shots showing an image with no HDR processing (left) and one with HDR capture in 3EV steps. 32mm focal length, ISO 400, 1/160 second at f/5.6.

      Still frame from video clip recorded at 1920 x 1080 pixels.

       Still frame from video clip recorded at 1280 x 720 pixels.
       

      Still frame from video clip recorded at 640 x 480 pixels

       

      Rating

      RRP: AU$849; MSRP US$700 (body only) or AU$899 / US$800 as reviewed with smc Pentax-DAL 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 AL WR kit lens

      • Build: 8.8
      • Ease of use: 8.5
      • Autofocusing: 8.5
      • Still image quality JPEG: 8.8
      • Still image quality RAW: 9.0
      • Video quality: 8.5

       

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