FIRST LOOK: Canon EOS M.

    In summary

    Although a late entrant into the mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera (ILC) category, Canon has made a couple of smart moves when developing the EOS M. The first has undoubtedly been using an existing sensor and image processor developed for a current DSLR. 

    From a production viewpoint, this decision should result in economies of scale at manufacturing level. In the current market climate, that could help to prevent the new camera from being priced above its perceived market value as has occurred in some rival situations.  (By our estimate, the average Australian street price for the body-only kit will probably be between $800 and $850.)

    The 18-megapixel sensor has high enough resolution to be taken seriously but doesn't push megapixel count to stratospheric levels for the sensor area like Sony's new RX100. The processor, though not the latest and fastest in Canon's stable, has a proven track record and is more than capable of handling the image data initial EOS M users will produce.

    The EF-EOS M Adapter represents the second smart move. Hitherto, Pentax has been the only company to develop an ILC (the K-01) to accept the full range of Pentax lenses. The adapter puts Canon in the same category, albeit by a slightly different route.

    While adapters are available for mounting DSLR lenses from other manufacturers to their ILC bodies, they haven't been offered with cameras themselves, instead driving buyers to purchase cameras with dedicated lenses in kit format. By supplying the adaptor with the EOS M body, Canon recognises its loyal EOS lens users and introduces a new camera body without demanding further investment.

    The adapter allows the EOS M to be seen as a potential back-up body for DSLR users at all levels of expertise because you get all the controls and functions you need (along with a lot you don't) in a very compact package. The small size of the camera and adapter mean they occupy very little space in a camera bag and their relatively light weight will make them ideal for bushwalkers who need to limit their loads.

    Removing the mirror box should also make the EOS M quieter to operate than a DSLR, which may be a deal-breaker for some photographers. It's certainly a less obvious camera to shoot with, which will make it sought-after by street photographers (where the touch focus will be particularly handy). If its high ISO performance matches that of the 650D, it will please those who take pictures at parties and social events. 

    We've been assured by Canon representatives that the EOS M is the first in a continuing series that will be 'fleshed out' with new bodies, lenses and accessories in the future. We hope this range extension includes models designed for photo enthusiasts. The EOS M is a great start, but it looks too much like a point-and-shoot camera to attract serious photographers. 

    If the line is to succeed, the target market needs to be widened with the design focus changing from 'easy to use' to 'exciting to take pictures with'.  We see potential for some co-mingling of the body design and controls from the G-series PowerShots with the basic EOS M structure. 

    An optional EVF would be a smart addition to the EOS M accessories range – and soon. But it would require high enough resolution and excellent colour reproduction to satisfy serious photographers.

    Given the success of the PowerShot G1X, we're certain an EOS M-type camera with the dial controls provided on the G1X would find plenty of buyers. Few would fret if Canon left out the auto shooting modes and effects settings provided on its entry-level cameras and concentrated on improving access to the adjustments photographers require: ISO, EVB compensation, aperture and shutter speed settings and drive modes. The challenge is out!

    We hope to review the EOS M and its lenses as soon as review units become available.

    Full review

    The EOS M, announced today, has been anticipated ever since the company announced the PowerShot G1X in January. Interestingly, the new camera is totally unlike the G1X, except in packing a large sensor into a compact camera body. Superficially reminiscent of the PowerShot SX100 IS, the EOS M provides most of the features of the recently-released EOS 650D, including the 18-megapixel APS-C sensor with on-chip phase detection AF and DIGIC 5 image processor.

    Front view of the EOS M with the 18-55mm kit lens and accessory Speedlite. (Source: Canon.) 

    Developed together with the EOS 650D, the EOS M is targeted at photographers who want high image quality without weight and complexity. The removal of the mirror box and viewfinder makes its body significantly smaller and around half the weight of the EOS 650D. The diagram below shows how this was achieved.

    Diagrams showing the side views of the EOS M (left) and EOS 650D (right) show how the removal of the mirror box and viewfinder assembly allows the camera body to become significantly thinner. (Source: Canon.)

    This feature  – and the fact that it provides most of the 650D's controls and recording functions and can use the same suite of lenses, will make the EOS M interesting to Canon DSLR owners looking for a light and compact camera body as a back-up for their DSLR.

    Build and Ergonomics
    Superficially, the EOS M looks a bit like the PowerShot SX230 HS. It has the same boxy shape with rounded corners, albeit with a classier-looking finish. With a magnesium front and stainless steel back plate, its body is considerably tougher and Canon claims it is strong enough to support the largest EF lenses.

    The EOS M chassis, showing the magnesium front plate and stainless steel lens mount. (Source: Canon.)

    Removing the mirror box and pentamirror has reduced the flange back distance (distance from the mounting plate to the sensor) from 44 mm in the 650D to just 18 mm. This has made the new camera's body significantly smaller (108.6 x 66.5 x 32.3 mm compared with 133.1 x 99.8 x 78.8 mm) and roughly half the weight of the EOS 650D. 

    The diagram above shows the EOS M's internal components. (Source: Canon.)

    The front panel is dominated by the lens mount, which is made from brushed stainless steel and has an outer diameter of 58 mm, compared with 65 mm on the 650D. As in other EOS cameras, this mounting plate is fully electronic, enabling fast communication of AF and aperture data between the camera and the lens.

    Comparison drawings showing the EOS M's EFM  mount (left) and EF/EF-S mount on the EOS 650D (right). (Source: Canon.)

    Concurrent with the release of the EOS M, Canon will release two lenses that have been purpose designed for the new system, an 18-55mm standard zoom and ultra-compact 22mm pancake, which will be described below. Otherwise, the front panel is relatively unadorned, with just a lens release button, AF-Assist LED and textured grip ridge interrupting the smooth surface.

    Front view of the EOS M with no lens. (Source: Canon.)

    The top panel is equally sparsely populated, with an inset on/off button and a shutter button surrounded by a basic shooting mode dial that has three positions:  Auto, Stills and Movies. A pair of microphones, each with seven tiny holes, is inset into the top panel left of the hot-shoe for recording movie soundtracks.

    The top panel of the EOS M with no lens fitted. (Source: Canon.)

    There's a standard hot-shoe that accepts Canon's SpeedLites and accessories like the GP-E2 GPS receiver and the RC-6 Wireless Remote control unit. But there's no support for accessories like shutter-release cables, battery grips, add-on viewfinders, wireless LAN or viewfinder accessories that are supported by EOS DSLRs.

    The rear panel has a similarly textured thumb pad just left of the Movie start/stop button, which is located in the top right hand corner. Most of the rear panel is dominated by the 3.0-inch Clear View II LCD monitor, which has a resolution of approximately 1.04 million dots and a smudge-resistant coating.

    The rear panel of the EOS M. (Source: Canon.)

     A capacitive Touch Screen panel in this screen allows users to control various functions by touch and supports touch, drag and multi-touch operations. Touch Focus and Touch Shutter operation are available, along with familiar reviewing gestures like 'pinch-to-zoom' and swiping to scroll between pictures.

    Two levels of sensitivity are available for the touch screen in the set-up (tools) menu. (Source: Canon.) 

    Below the thumb pad are buttons for accessing the Menu and Playback controls. Both are based on similar controls in the EOS 650D and provide the same access to camera settings.

    Below these buttons sits a standard Canon arrow pad with surrounding scroll wheel, similar to those on PowerShot cameras. Directional controls access (clockwise from top) the drive, exposure compensation, delete and AF/FE lock functions. The central SET button also displays a Quick Control menu, similar to the one in EOS DSLRs.

    An Info button is located between the arrow pad and the base plate. The battery and card compartment is located in the base plate. The EOS M uses a different battery from the 650D and, being reliant on the LCD monitor for composing and reviewing shots as well as adjusting camera settings, it's not surprising to find its  capacity is less than the 650D's (230 vs 440 shots/charge).

    The base plate of the EOS M. (Source: Canon.)

    A tripod socket is located on the lens axis, mid-way across the base plate. Connectors for AV Out/Digital, HDMI and Mic-in plugs can be found on the left hand side panel, below a lift-up cover.
     

    Canon advises that the tripod mounting on the lens should be used when larger EOS EF  lenses are fitted to the EOS M body. (Source: Canon.)

    Sensor and Image Processor
    The sensor in the EOS M is the same as the sensor in the EOS 650D and boasts 18-megapixel resolution. Compared with other manufacturers' mirrorless interchangeable lens systems, it's slightly smaller than the sensors in the Sony and Fujifilm cameras but noticeably larger than the Micro Four thirds sensors used in Olympus and Panasonic cameras and slightly less than double the size of the sensor in the Nikon 1 cameras. The table below provides comparative dimensions.

     

    Width

    Height

    Diagonal

    Area

    Samsung

    23.5 mm

    15.7 mm

    28.3 mm

    369 mm2

    Fujifilm

    23.6 mm

    15.6 mm

    28.3 mm

    368 mm2

    Sony

    23.6 mm

    15.6 mm

    28.3 mm

    368 mm2

    Canon EOS M

    22.3 mm

    14.9 mm

    26.8 mm

    332 mm2

    Olympus

    17.3 mm

    13.0 mm

    21.6 mm

    225 mm2

    Panasonic

    17.3 mm

    13.0 mm

    21.6 mm

    225 mm2

    Nikon 1

    13.2 mm

    8.8 mm

    15.9 mm

    116 mm2

    Pentax Q

    6.2 mm

    4.6 mm

    7.7 mm

    29 mm2

    The sensor is partnered with Canon's DIGIC 5 image processor, which is also used in the EOS 650D. A fast readout from the sensor and 4-bit A/D conversion, provide same high sensitivity performance in both cameras. 

    Like its larger 'cousin', the EOS M supports ISO settings from 100 to 12800, with expansion to ISO 25600 in the 'H' mode. The movie mode restricted to a maximum of ISO 6400and this is also the upper limit for the Easy Shot stills capture modes.

    Continuous shooting is supported at a maximum of 4.3 frames/second (fps), which is marginally slower than the five frames/second burst speed of the 650D. The buffer memory is smaller than the 650D's, with space for up to 17 Large/Fine JPEGs if an 8GB UHS-1 compatible card is used or 15 shots with slower cards. Six CR2.RAW frames or three RAW+JPEG pairs can be stored in bursts before capture rates are slowed to allow for processing. Frame rates slow when tracking AF is used to between 1.2 and 1.7 fps. Tracking AF is only available with EF-M lenses. 

    Eight JPEG sizes and two compression levels are provided  but only one raw file option (recording at 5184 x 3456 pixels). Large/Fine is the only JPEG size available for RAW+JPEG capture. 

    Image quality settings. (Source: Canon.)

    EOS M users can choose from four aspect ratios: the standard  3:2 plus 4:3, 1:1 and 16:9 aspect ratios, achieved by cropping. The table below provides a guide to typical file sizes for 3:2 aspect ratio images. 

    Quality

    Pixels

    File size

    JPEG

    Large/Fine

    5184 x 3456

    6.6MB

    Large/Normal

    3.3MB

    Medium/Fine

    3456 x 2304

    3.5MB

    Medium/Normal

    1.8MB

    Small/Fine

    2592 x 1728

    2.2MB

    Small/Normal

    1.1MB

    RAW

    RAW

    5184 x 3456

    25.1MB

    RAW+JPEG

    RAW/Large

    5184 x 3456 + 5184 x 3456

    31.7MB

    Video
    Movie clips are recorded in MPEG-4 format, using AVC.H.264 compression and a variable bit rate. Program AE and manual shooting modes are supported in movie mode. The table below shows the options available, along with typical recording times and file sizes.

    Movie resolution

    Frame rates

    File size

    1920 x 1080

    30/25/24 fps

    330MB/minute

    1280 x 720

    60/50 fps

    330MB/minute

    640 x 480

    30/250 fps

    82.5MB/minute

    The hybrid AF system works in much the same way in movie mode as it does for shooting stills. It uses phase-difference AF to achieve approximate focus and drive the lens at high speed, then switches to contrast AF for final focusing. 

    Focusing modes include One-Shot and Servo AF with Face Detection + Tracking AF, Multi-point Live AF, Single-point Live AF Three AF modes supported for shooting both stills and movies. Touch AF is also  supported for both stills and movies. A special Video Servo AF mode keeps servo AF active at all times, even when the shutter button is not pressed. 

    To counteract the rolling shutter phenomenon associated with typical CMOS sensor-electronic shutter systems, the EOS M's shutter  combines an electronic front curtain and mechanical shutter.  Canon's Video Snap movie shooting and editing functions allow even novice users to create movie clips easily. 

    Controls and Displays
    Because adjustments to camera functions rely on using the monitor screen, most camera settings are made using the LCD monitor and menu systems. The menus in the EOS M are based on Canon's DSLR menus but, without a viewfinder, icons are used to indicate certain settings on the live view display.

    Only three shooting modes – Auto Stills and Movies– are available via lever selection, using a ring around the shutter button. The rest are accessed via the camera menu or the Quick Control display. The camera shows brief explanations of shooting modes as they are selected, as shown in below.

    Shooting mode selection. (Source: Canon.)

    The icons vary with different shooting modes, with the greatest use of icons being in the automated modes.  The illustrations below provide examples of how these icons allow users to see which scene type the camera has selected in both stills and video modes when the Scene Intelligent Auto is used.

    Scene Intelligent Auto icons displayed when shooting stills. (Source: Canon.)

    Scene Intelligent Auto icons displayed when shooting movies. (Source: Canon.)

    The EOS M provides the same range of Picture Styles as other EOS cameras, with the same parameter adjustments.

    Picture Style settings. (Source: Canon.

    Creative Filter effects are also the same as in the EOS 650D.

    Applying Creative Filter effects in live view. (Source: Canon.)

    Playback options and bundled software are the same as in the EOS 650D and covered in detail in our review of that camera. (INSERT LINK)

    New Lenses and the EF-EOS M Adapter
    The EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM is a standard zoom lens that has been designed specifically for the smaller lens mounting. It includes the same image stabilisation as Canon's latest EF-S lenses, with a claimed advantage of about four f-stops. The latest STM drive ensures smooth and quiet autofocusing while shooting movies.

    The new EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens. (Source: Canon.)

    A shorter back focus distance and arrangement of three aspherical lens elements enable this lens to be quite a bit smaller than the EF-S equivalent, although not lighter. A higher-quality anodised aluminium barrel and the additional lens elements contribute to the increase in weight. The table below compares these lenses. 

     

    EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM

    EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II 

    Lens construction

    13 elements in 11 groups

    11 elements in 9 groups

    Min. focusing distance

    25 cm

    25 cm

    Max. magnification

    0.25x at 55mm

    0.34x at 55mm

    AF  motor

    STM (stepping motor)

    DC Micro Motor

    Filter diameter

    52 mm

    58 mm

    Dimensions (Diam. x length)

    60.9 x 61 mm

    68.4 x 70 mm

    Weight

    Approx. 210 grams

    Approx. 200 grams

    The optical design of the lens includes two Glass-Mould aspherical lens elements (lens elements no. 4 and no. 10 in the diagram below) and one high precision aspherical lens element (lens element no. 12). The lens cap and lens dust cap EB are included as standard accessories. The lens hood and lens case are sold separately.

    The optical diagram for the EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens. (Source: Canon.)

    A cross section of the EOS M and EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens. (Source: Canon.)

    The Image Stabiliser can be turned on and off using the camera menu. A Dynamic IS function provides additional steadiness for movie shooting while walking by expanding the angular range, particularly at the wide-angle end and increasing the degree of correction. Dynamic IS only activates in movie mode.

    The new EF-M 22 f/2 STM for EOS M isn't Canon's first pancake lens; the EF 40mm f/2.8 lens announced with the EOS 650D claims that honour. Built with portability and ease-of-use in mind, it is ideal for everyday photography because it's fast and covers a moderately wide field of view.  The table below compares key features of the EF-M and EF pancake lenses.

     

    EF-M 22mm f/2 STM

    EF 40mm f/2.8 STM

    Lens construction

    7 elements in 6 groups

    6 elements in 4 groups

    Equivalent focal length in 35mm format

    35.2mm

    64mm

    Min. focusing distance

    15 cm

    30 cm

    Maximum magnification

    0.21x

    0.18x

    AF  motor

    STM (stepping motor)

    Filter diameter

    43 mm

    52 mm

    Dimensions (Diam. x length)

    60.9 x 23.7 mm

    68.6 x 22.9 mm

    Weight

    Approx. 105 grams

    Approx. 130 grams

     The optical design of the lens includes one Glass-Mould aspherical lens element (lens element no. 7 in the diagram below). The lens cap and lens dust cap EB are included as standard accessories, with a threaded lens hood and soft drawstring case are sold separately.

    The new EF-M 22mm f/2 STM 'pancake' lens. (Source: Canon.)

    The optical diagram for the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM lens. (Source: Canon.)

    Build quality is similar to the EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens. The outer barrel is made from anodised aluminium and the very narrow focusing ring has an impressed diamond pattern to provide a secure grip.

    This lens has an EMD (Electro Magnetic Diaphragm) with a seven-bladed iris that closes to a circular aperture. Points of light and light sources in the background of shots can be recorded with nearly circular bokeh when the lens is used at wide apertures.

    The actuator control algorithms for both lenses is matched to the camera’s AF algorithm to support fast autofocusing. When the camera’s AF + MF mode is set, full-time manual focusing allows users to fine-tune focus adjustments by pressing the shutter button half way down and turning the focusing ring.

    The EF-EOS M Adapter allows all EF and EF-S lens to be used with the EOS M body. Fitted to the camera in much the same way as Canon's interchangeable lenses and conversion lenses, it supports all lens functions, enabling them to be used in the same ways as on EOS DSLR bodies.  Camera and Lens mount indexes (red for EF lenses and white for EF-S lenses) allow users to check mounting positions.

    The EF-EOS M Adapter has been designed to complement the EOS M camera and EF and EF-S lenses. (Source: Canon.)

    It is supplied with a tripod mount that can be easily attached and detached. The tripod mount features die-cast metal parts. It's attached to the mount adapter by pushing it against the adapter and tightening the knob. Turning the knob to loosen the screw allows it to be easily detached.

    The EF-EOS M Adapter is 26 mm long and has a maximum diameter of 66.6 mm. It weighs only 110 grams without the tripod mount attached.

    When using a lens that is heavier than the EOS M camera,  users should support the lens rather than the camera. For lenses that already have tripod mounts, the tripod mount on the adapter should not be used as the mount on the lens will provide better support. 

    A camera cover (front cap) and lens dust cap (rear cap) are included as standard accessories with this mount adapter. A soft drawstring carrying case is sold separately.

    Other Accessories
    Also announced with the EOS M is a new compact and lightweight flash unit, the SpeedLite 90EX, which is an excellent companion to the new camera. With coverage for up to 24mm wide angle lens shots and a guide number of 9 (meters at ISO 100), this flash uses the standard Canon EOS hotshoe mount for compatibility with all Canon cameras that include a hotshoe. The flash can wirelessly control slave units for creative multiple-flash shoots.

    Front and rear views of the SpeedLite 90EX. (Source: Canon.)

    Other optional accessories include the GP-E2 GPS receiver and the RC-6 Wireless Remote control unit.

    Summing Up
    Although a late entrant into the mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera (ILC) category, Canon has made a couple of smart moves when developing the EOS M. The first has undoubtedly been using an existing sensor and image processor developed for a current DSLR. 

    From a production viewpoint, this decision should result in economies of scale at manufacturing level. In the current market climate, that could help to prevent the new camera from being priced above its perceived market value as has occurred in some rival situations.  (By our estimate, the average Australian street price for the body-only kit will probably be between $800 and $850.)

    The 18-megapixel sensor has high enough resolution to be taken seriously but doesn't push megapixel count to stratospheric levels for the sensor area like Sony's new RX100. The processor, though not the latest and fastest in Canon's stable, has a proven track record and is more than capable of handling the image data initial EOS M users will produce.

    The EF-EOS M Adapter represents the second smart move. Hitherto, Pentax has been the only company to develop an ILC (the K-01) to accept the full range of Pentax lenses. The adapter puts Canon in the same category, albeit by a slightly different route.

    While adapters are available for mounting DSLR lenses from other manufacturers to their ILC bodies, they haven't been offered with cameras themselves, instead driving buyers to purchase cameras with dedicated lenses in kit format. By supplying the adaptor with the EOS M body, Canon recognises its loyal EOS lens users and introduces a new camera body without demanding further investment.

    The adapter allows the EOS M to be seen as a potential back-up body for DSLR users at all levels of expertise because you get all the controls and functions you need (along with a lot you don't) in a very compact package. The small size of the camera and adapter mean they occupy very little space in a camera bag and their relatively light weight will make them ideal for bushwalkers who need to limit their loads.

    Removing the mirror box should also make the EOS M quieter to operate than a DSLR, which may be a deal-breaker for some photographers. It's certainly a less obvious camera to shoot with, which will make it sought-after by street photographers (where the touch focus will be particularly handy). If its high ISO performance matches that of the 650D, it will please those who take pictures at parties and social events. 

    We've been assured by Canon representatives that the EOS M is the first in a continuing series that will be 'fleshed out' with new bodies, lenses and accessories in the future. We hope this range extension includes models designed for photo enthusiasts. The EOS M is a great start, but it looks too much like a point-and-shoot camera to attract serious photographers. 

    If the line is to succeed, the target market needs to be widened with the design focus changing from 'easy to use' to 'exciting to take pictures with'.  We see potential for some co-mingling of the body design and controls from the G-series PowerShots with the basic EOS M structure. 

    An optional EVF would be a smart addition to the EOS M accessories range – and soon. But it would require high enough resolution and excellent colour reproduction to satisfy serious photographers.

    Given the success of the PowerShot G1X, we're certain an EOS M-type camera with the dial controls provided on the G1X would find plenty of buyers. Few would fret if Canon left out the auto shooting modes and effects settings provided on its entry-level cameras and concentrated on improving access to the adjustments photographers require: ISO, EVB compensation, aperture and shutter speed settings and drive modes. The challenge is out!

    We hope to review the EOS M and its lenses as soon as review units become available.

    SPECS

    Image sensor: 22.3 x 14.9 mm CMOS sensor with approximately 19 million photosites (18 megapixels effective )
    Image processor: DIGIC 5
    A/D processing: 14-bit
    Lens mount: Canon EFM (EF/EF-S via adaptor)
    Focal length crop factor: 1.6x
    Image formats: Stills – CR2.RAW, JPEG (Exif 2.3), RAW+JPEG; Movies – MPEG-4 AVC/H.264
    Image Sizes: Stills – 5184 x 3456, 3456 x 2304, 2592 x 1728, 1920 x 1080, 720 x 480; Movies: 1920 x 1080 (Full HD) at 30p/25p/24p, 1280 x 720 (HD) at 60p/50p, 640 x 480 (SD) at 30p/25p
    Image Stabilisation: Lens-based only
    Dust removal: Canon Integrated Cleaning System (vibration of low-pass filter;  Auto, Manual, Dust Delete Data appending)
    Shutter speed range: 30 to 1/4000 second plus Bulb; X-synch at 1/200 sec.
    Exposure Compensation: +/- 5EV in 1/3 or 1/2 EV steps
    Exposure bracketing: +/- 2EV in 1/3 or 1/2 EV steps (Can be combined with manual exposure compensation)
    Self-timer: 2 or 10 seconds delay
    Focus system: Hybrid CMOS AF system (contrast-based with phase-detection sensors in the centre of the frame) with 31 AF points 
    Focus modes: One-Shot AF, Servo AF with Face Detection + Tracking AF, Multi-point Live AF, Single-point Live AF
    Exposure metering: 63-zone TTL full-aperture metering with Evaluative (linked to all AF points), Partial (approx. 9% of viewfinder at centre), Spot (approx. 4% of viewfinder at centre) and Centre-weighted average metering
    Shooting modes: Scene Intelligent Auto, Program AE, Shutter-priority AE, Aperture-priority AE, Manual exposure, Creative Auto, Portrait, Landscape, Close-up, Sports, Night Portrait, Handheld Night Scene, HDR Backlight Control 
    Picture Style/Control settings:  Auto, Standard, Portrait, Landscape, Neutral, Faithful, Monochrome, User Def. 1 - 3
    Colour space options: sRGB, Adobe RGB
    Creative filters: Grainy B/W, Soft focus, Fish-eye effect, Art bold effect, Water painting effect, Toy camera effect, Miniature effect
    ISO range: Basic Zone modes: ISO 100 - 6400; Creative Zone modes: ISO 100 - 12800 set manually; expansion to ISO 25600 available in Creative Zone modes
    White balance: Auto, Preset (Daylight, Shade, Cloudy, Tungsten light, White fluorescent light, Flash*), Custom; WB correction and bracketing provided; * Flash colour temperature information transmission enabled
    Flash: Compatible with EX Series Speedlites (Flash functions settable with the camera); E-TTL II autoflash metering; flash exposure compensation of +/-2EV in 1/3- or 1/2-stop increments; FE Lock available
    Sequence shooting: Max. 4.3 frames/second for up to 15 large/fine JPEGs, 6 CR2.RAW files or 3 RAW+JPEG pairs with standard cards; up to 17 JPEG capacity with  UHS-I compatible 8 GB card
    Custom Functions/Copyright embedding: 7 (My Menu registration supported) / copyright entry and embedding possible
    Storage Media: SD/ SDHC/ SDXC memory cards (UHS-1 and Eye-Fi compatible)
    Viewfinder: None
    LCD monitor: 3-inch 3:2 aspect TFT colour LCD with approx. 1.04 million dots; capacitative touch screen technology
    Playback functions: Single-frame, Index (4 or 9 frames), Enlarge (1.5x  to 10x), Highlight alert, Slideshow with background music, Picture rotation (auto mode available), Histogram (independent luminance/RGB available), Shooting information; jump by 10 or 100 images, by shooting date, by folder, by movies, by stills, by rating; movie playback
    Interface terminals: USO 2.0, HDMI (Type C Mini), A/V out, GPS Receiver GP-E2 connection, 3.5 mm diameter stereo mini-jack for external microphone, terminal for Remote Switch RS-60E3, Wireless remote control and Eye-Fi card supported
    Power supply: LP-E12 rechargeable lithium-ion battery; CIPA rated for approx. 230 shots/charge 
    Dimensions (wxhxd): Approx. 108.6 x 66.5 x 32.3 mm
    Weight: Approx. 262 grams (body only)

    BUY